Mrs Debbie McCall

Mrs Debbie McCall

Interviewed on 07.07.2011

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[TRACK 1]

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

It’s Colden School, 7th of July 2011, talking to Mrs McCall.

TONY WRIGHT: First question?

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

How long have you lived in Colden?

MRS MCCALL: I’ve lived round here since 1999, so twelve years.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Have you ever had a favourite place to go near Colden?

MM: I like Hardcastle Crags; I like walking down to Hardcastle Crags and I like the area around where I live. There’s lots of fields and paths and walks round there, and I like Hebden Bridge as a town, I think it’s a really nice town to live near.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

How has it changed since you’ve been here?

MM: I think Market Street has got much more trendy, a lot of shops which weren’t there when I first came. There were a lot more second-hand shops, and shops that were boarded up so I think that’s changed quite a bit since I arrived and the main street around St George’s Square wasn’t pedestrianised so all the buses came down the centre of town. Now you walk up there. I think that’s a huge improvement. It all opens up to the river now and before you were in traffic all the time.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Where were you brought up?

MM: I was born in Belfast in Northern Ireland and I lived there till I was 10 then my family moved to Hartlepool in the northeast of England. I’ve lived in various places since then. I lived in London for a while, for four or five years, and then I lived in Spain for a year. Then I came back and I lived in Leeds and then I lived in Munich in Germany for four years and that’s when I came from Germany to Blackshaw Head.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

What was the difference between here and Ireland?

MM: Well I was quite young when I left Ireland. When I came over from Ireland, what I noticed was none of the houses had hedges in the estate that I lived in. I lived in a cul- de-sac, and I came to estates there and they had no hedges at all, I thought that was very odd. There were a lot of net curtains that nobody seemed to have in Ireland.

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The pavements were different because they were all slabs here, and in Ireland we often had tarmaced pavements with little white chips in them, little bits of chalk. Those were the things I really noticed as a child, and of course I was a real oddity because my accent was very different from everybody else. I got quite a lot of stick about that when I first came over. It’s not so strong anymore.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Can you describe your school days?

MM: What age? When I was at primary school?

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Yes.

MM: I went to a school called Strathearn in Belfast.....and I had a sort of moss green coloured tunic uniform with a tie and a beige shirt. We called the classes P1, P2, P3, P4 right up to P7,so when I came to England the forms were all called by different names so that was very confusing to me.

We had a very strict teacher called Miss Simpson. She was the deputy head and she used to wear those black gowns teachers wore then. It was a nice school and we had to walk a little crocodile in pairs for our school dinners to the senior school which was along the road and further away. In year five and year six we did exams at the end of the year, we had strict exams.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

When you were in primary school, who was your best friend?

MM: My best friend was a friend called Rosalind Moore and she lived in the same street as me, and we were in the same class at school.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

How was your primary school different to Colden?

MM: Well you don’t have a uniform here do you?

[SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

No.

MM: You don’t do exams at the end of the year. You do the SATs thing, but not formal

exams, They were very strict exams with people walking up and down the passageways and looking over our shoulders while we were working. My school was an all girls’ school as well, but actually there was one boy in the entire school but I don’t know what that was about. He was called Michael, but it was a single sex school.

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[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Did you have any homework?

MM: Yes, we always had homework. We had to learn tables, had to do spellings, had to write stories sometimes. Yeah, we got homework every night.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What was your favourite subject?

MM: English. I loved writing stories, still do sometimes.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Who was your....who was your favourite teacher?

MM: My favourite teacher was Mrs Graham, she was just a very kind, gentle person.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Did you have any computers then?

MM: No, no computers, no. No whiteboards, just blackboards and chalk, pens and paper, no computers, no calculators even.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

When you was in primary school, where did you used to go for walks, like for trips?

MM: Do you know I don’t remember going for any trips from primary school. When I came to England I still had two years in primary school when I came to England and we went to somewhere near Helmsley. I think it was called Flamingo Park or something. That’s the only trip I remember but I don’t remember doing any trips at all in Ireland.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Where did you used to go on holidays as a child?

MM: When I lived in Belfast which is a city in Northern Ireland we went to Donegal every year. It is on the north west coast of Northern Ireland and it’s absolutely beautiful. It would take us about three or four hours to drive there and that’s where we went for our holidays.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Where was the first place you visited abroad?

MM: Spain. I went to Spain when I was about 12.

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[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Where was the last place you went abroad?

MM: Last year I went to Spain; I’m very fond of Spain [laughing]. I lived in Spain, I can speak a bit of Spanish and we’ve got a cousin who lives in Madrid so we go to Spain a lot.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What was the first job you had?

MM: As a teenager I weekends in a department store in Hartlepool in the stationery department.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What did you enjoy about it?

MM: I’d sort all the cards, you know, the birthday cards, the Christmas cards. We used to put all those in order and make sure they had envelopes and because I’m a person who likes organising that was right up my street. What I hated was....sometimes they would put me on a little section for selling cameras and I didn’t know anything about cameras. So it was always terrifying when I was put on there. I was hopeless.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

If you hadn’t been in the department store, what would you have liked to do?

MM: I think at that age I would probably have liked to have done something working with animals probably. I wanted to be a vet, but I went off that idea.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What has been your favourite job so far?

MM: That’s an interesting question. Well my most interesting job was when I worked as a probation officer. Do you know what a probation officer is?

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Yeah.

MM: Working with criminals in the criminal justice system, and I liked that because it was very varied. One day you’d be meeting people in your office and meeting their families. Another day you’d be visiting people in prison, another day you would be working in courts .There was a lot of variety and lots of interesting people that you met along the way.

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[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Have you got any hobbies?

MM: Yes. I do lots of reading and I’m a big gardener. I love growing veg and I keep chickens. I sing in a choir in Hebden Bridge .I do quite a bit of baking, that’s what I’ve done just before I’ve come here today....and karaoke [laughing]

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

If you were going out for a meal where would you go?

MM: In or around Hebden do you mean, or anywhere?

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Anywhere.

MM: Our family quite like Pizza Express, we go there quite often, and we like Wagamamas if we’re in big cities. If we choose as a family those are the top two we go to.

In Hebden I go to a place called Greens which is a sort of veggie place, I quite like that and the Stubbing Wharf because you get great big enormous portions of fish and chips [laughing]

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your favourite thing to eat?

MM I eat quite a lot of fish because I don’t eat meat, so I like....tuna.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

And what do you like to drink the most?

MM: White wine [laughing]

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Are you worried about global warming?

MM: Yes I am because I worked for a project you might have heard of in Todmorden, the next town along from Hebden, called Incredible Edible. I’m not working for them now but I volunteer for them and that is all to do with worries about climate change and the environment. In particular it looks at food and where our food comes from, and how we can produce as much of our own food close to home. I’m very involved with that.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your favourite animal?

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MM: A cat. I’ve got two cats at home.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What changes have you seen over the years at Colden?

MM: At the school?

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Yes.

MM: Well all the new bit, the pre-school bit, that was.....what was it Mrs Scott, you’ll remember, was it a caravan?

MRS SCOTT: Porta....

MM: Portakabin, yes, a draughty, leaking portakabin and now we’ve got that fantastic building there, and the play area wasn’t here, the veg beds weren’t here, so the building’s changed quite a lot. I think those are the main things I can think of really. Staff haven’t changed that much since I became involved with the school.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What are your views on the recession?

MM: On the recession.....well I think most of us are paying a very high price for bankers and other people with a lot of money. We’ve taken a lot of risks and made a lot of mistakes, and we’re paying for it and they aren’t most of the time.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Do you think Colden’s a safer place than you used to live?

MM: Yes it’s a very safe place. Belfast was a very dodgy place to live because there was a war on when I was there [laughing] so there were lots of parts of Belfast we just didn’t go near because people were fighting. Most of the towns and cities I’ve lived in, you know, you have to be kind of careful about what you had in your car and you have to lock your house when you go out. Maybe I shouldn’t be saying this, but I don’t do that when I go out [laughing], I feel really safe where we are, that’s part of the reason that we live here, we don’t have to worry about this kind of stuff, touch wood.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Have you got any advice for children leaving school now?

MM:

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Work hard.....get the best qualifications you can because that gives you the biggest choice for what you do when you leave school. The harder you work at school and the more qualifications you get, then that gives you much more choice about what you do, and do what you love and what you feel good about.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

How many children have you had, and got at Calder?

MM: Two.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What are your views on education?

MM: I think education is really important for the reasons I said before, because I think it gives you lots of choices about what you can do later on in life, and I think it should be fun. I sometimes worry there’s a bit too much sitting at desks writing stuff out.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

How has the quality of life improved?

MM: Well...what, over the last few years?

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Yes.

MM: For me and my family do you mean?

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Yes.

MM: Well there’s pros and cons to this really. I think we have more choice about the kind of things that we can buy, and everybody’s got a lot more stuff than they used to have. But perhaps we don’t need as much of it. In the shops you can buy a whole range of things, whether it’s food or whatever but sometimes that’s because we’re not paying properly for other countries to produce it for us, sometimes people are suffering for that. However, generally speaking, we don’t want for very much most of us do we? We’ve everything we need.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your favourite supermarket?

MM: I don’t really like supermarkets. I try and avoid them, so I try and shop locally if I can. I grow some of my own food, and my big thing from Incredible Edible is about buying food that people from round here have produced and grown themselves.

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I go to supermarkets if I need things like great big boxes of washing powder or something like that. They’re cheaper there, but if I can avoid going into supermarkets I don’t go to them because I think they take away business from lots of other people who are working really hard to produce food and goods for us.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your job at the moment?

MM: I’m not working at the moment. I’ve just finished working for Incredible Edible where I was called a Food Inspirer, and my job was to go out and inspire people to grow their own food and cook their own food and generally just get involved in cooking food in all different kinds of ways.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your favourite TV programme?

MM: I’ve been watching The Apprentice because I think it’s hilarious, and [laughing] we watch Come Dine With Me quite a lot, but I try not to watch too much telly. I watch comedy most of the time but I try not to watch too much telly.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your favourite thing to bake?

MM: To bake?

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Yes.

MM: I make a very good Victoria sponge cake or a big meringue covered in cream and lots of fruit, lots of berries....

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Would you say that kitchen is big or small?

MM: I think I’ve got a good sized kitchen, yes. It’s big enough for us, that’s for sure.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

And is your house big or small?

MM: I think it’s kind of medium. It’s big enough for us [laughing]

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Are you worried about your global footprint?

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MM: Yes I am. I try hard to recycle. This morning I’ve just had somebody come round to see if we can have some solar panels on our roof, and we bought a smaller car because we want to use less petrol. Sometimes when you live in the country it’s a bit tricky because if there isn’t a good bus service and you’re at a distance from things. Sometimes you use the car more than you would like to really, and then the thing about food and buying food locally, that’s to do with my carbon footprint as well. I try not to fly, maybe just once a year for holidays but not little weekend flights and that kind of stuff.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What are your views on pollution?

MM: Well I worry about pollution and I think we’re too reliant on the car really. It would be really helpful if the government would give us lots more good public transport so that we can all travel together instead of millions of cars being on the road.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your favourite type of public transport?

MM: Trains. I like sitting on a train looking out of the window.

TW: Have you finished your questions?

[CHILDREN]:

Yes thank you, yes.

TW:

Well I think I’m going to ask a few and if you want to ask some others following on from what I’ve asked, then feel free to join in, okay? I was curious about.....you said you lived in Spain and in Germany and, was that to do with work or.....why did you move to these other countries?

MM: We decided we were going to take a year out so we saved up, me and my partner, and saved some extra money so we’d have some when we came home. We just finished our jobs and went off in a VW camper van to Spain for a year. We drove all the way down there, down to the south, and we camped for a few months and then the van blew up, so that was a bit of a problem [laughing] .We were there for a year, just because we wanted to try something different and just have a different experience. While we were there we taught English to various Spanish students and then when the money ran out we came home. We came back to Leeds because my sister lives in Leeds and I have friends who live in Todmorden so we came back to the north, having previously lived in London, and my partner got a job in Munich.

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So I was working in Leeds for a while and once he got a permanent job we decided we would go out to Munich and we were there for four years. Then I had my first baby and we decided we wanted to be near our families so we came home.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What was your favourite country to live in?

MM: Spain, yes.

TW:

Did they have a different lifestyle over there then to here?

MM: Yes they do, a very different lifestyle. For a start it’s lovely and warm for most of the time. There’s a different pace of life.....most people kind of go to the shops daily so there aren’t masses of big supermarkets in the towns; there’s some out on the edge of the towns but most people shop locally in the towns. They just live outdoors a lot, your sit outdoors drinking coffees and tea and people are out for walks all the time, it’s a bit more chilled out really I think and that’s nice.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

How did you feel when your camper van blew up?

MM: I was devastated because we were living in it [laughing] so we had to go and find a flat. We’d gone to collect some friends from the airport and as we were chugging up a very steep hill it just suddenly burst into flames outside a café. We jumped out and in a panic we couldn’t remember the right word for ‘firemen’ so Daddy was shouting - for bombers not firemen when he jumped out, [laughing] . Men ran out of the café and started thrashing it with bits of twig and flames were coming out and David was going ‘my camera’s in there, my posh camera’s in there’ so we went back into it and I said ‘don’t go, leave the camera, it’s going to explode’ and I’ve just remembered you’re filming all this [laughing more]. Anyway eventually, I can’t remember how we put it out but anyway it was stuck on the side of the road and it ended up in a garage. I think it got towed back to the UK in the end, but yeah, it was a disaster, a complete disaster.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

Where were you living when you were trying to find somewhere to live, after your van blew up?

MM: Well we were in a town called El Puerto de Santa Maria right down on the south coast. I t was like a little seaside town and then inland there was a bigger town called Jerez, that’s where all the sherry in the world comes from, and we eventually hiked around and we found a little flat so we lived in a flat, which actually was a lot better than the camper van I have to say.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

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Would you like to live in Spain permanently?

MM: Well, yes I would love to live in Spain permanently but my family and my friends are over here and that’s the tricky thing when you move away and live somewhere else, that you miss your friends and your family, and you really might just see them for a couple of weeks a year and that’s a big thing so eventually you want to come home. All friends and family could come out there to visit me a lot and I would be very happy living somewhere slightly warmer, and I could grow all kinds of exotic things that I can’t grow here – passion fruit and melons and....peaches and lemons and oranges, and that would be fab.

[ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN]:

What is your favourite Spanish food?

MM: Well I don’t eat meat, so lots of the fish stuff they do I like. My favourite is prawns in all different shapes and sizes and it’s absolutely delicious. The other thing they do is alcachofas, which is artichokes boiled up in a nice sort of soupy thing and very tasty. The only thing I don’t like about Spain is bull fighting, that’s.....hideous.

TW:

Are they as aware of sort of global warming and you know, the ecological things that are happening in the world, as we seem to be in Britain?

MM: Yeah I think they are; I think there are certainly pockets of places where...of course they have a massive issue with water problems in lots of areas. In the south of Spain they have huge droughts every year and forest fires and that’s because we pillage the land with golf courses and God knows what Incredible Edible who I worked for, have a kind of partnership with another similar sort of project that grows its own food in Granada. We had visits from lots of....eco tourist people who came over from Spain, so you know I do think there are lots of pockets of places where they are really trying hard to do something about it.

TW:

Right. How did Incredible Edible get involved with Spain then?

MM: I think it’s just somebody who has a connection with somebody else and you know, the whole networking stuff. One of the women, one of the main drivers of Incredible Edible in Todmorden has a very close friend in Granada and that’s how we got together.

TW:

So, was it Mary Clear who started Incredible Edible?

MM: She’s one of the four founders, yeah.

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TW:

Were you part of it from the beginning then?

MM: No I’ve been involved for about the past two years and then I worked for them for the past nine months, and now continue to volunteer for it, yeah.....not from scratch, but

TW:

And do you think it’s working well?

MM: Yeah, it’s fantastic. It’s staggering that they’ve got to where they’ve got to with a very small amount of volunteers and the kind of joined up thinking they’re doing is just amazing. They’ve got a massive new project in Walsden, they have a poly tunnel and ducks and chickens, and you should all go and have a look, it looks great.

TW:

Oh really, whereabouts is that?

MM: Just as you go out of Walsden towards Summit there’s a big pallet factory on your left hand side, and Gordon Rigg gave them their land, as s part of their land, the garden centre, and so there’s a big fenced off area there.

You can see it from the road, call in – you’re welcome to go any time .There’s lots of community beds there so people who haven’t got a garden themselves can do their own food growing .They’re hoping to be selling salad foods next year so it’s got to be economically self sufficient too, and ducks and chickens.

TW:

Are you doing something with bees now?

MM: We’ve just won £44,000 pounds from the Jubilee People’s Lottery for a bee project, and that is going to be setting up some hives in and around Todmorden, buying the bee suit and the whole kit. We will be sending people on training courses to learn how to look after bees because they’re so critical in pollinating plants and helping plants to grow, and then lots of information around the town about what we’re doing, about what bees are and how important they are and lots of signage. And there’ll be a little bee trail going round Todmorden

TW:

So is this just for people in Tod or is it for anyone in the Upper Valley?

MM: Anyone in the Upper Valley I think, yeah. Incredible Edible’s all about spreading it out – Incredible Spreadable Edible [laughing]

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

How did Incredible Edible get its name?

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MM: Mary Clear was one of the first people. There was a group of four people sitting around a table saying ‘what can we do about global warming?’ and we decided we had to pick on something that you can do something about. They focused on food and as they were sitting around the table, Mary’s daughter came in and said ‘why don’t you call it Incredible Edible?’ and there it was – it’s a great name isn’t it?

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Were you a keen grower before you got involved with Incredible Edible?

MM: Yes, I’ve always been trying to grown food. Even when I was in Spain and I had a tiny little balcony I had a tomato plant on that balcony. In Germany I didn’t have a garden, I just had a balcony and I grew food on there so yeah, I’ve always been into growing. When I was little my dad gave me a little patch of ground in the garden in Ireland and that’s where I started off, growing peas and beans in there and it’s never left me really.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

What is your favourite type of fruit or vegetables?

MM: Well to be quite honest I don’t really eat a lot of fruit, which is a bit naughty, but veg I like. Peas and beans, and growing them fresh. I like asparagus and potatoes – I’m Irish. [laughing]

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

What is your favourite thing to grow?

MM: Well at the moment I’m growing lots of rocket, you know that salady leaf that’s kind of a peppery leaf. Normally I grow that and it bolts immediately but I’ve got a fat crop of that this year and fruit. I’ve got lots of blackcurrants and redcurrants and I’ve just made loads of jam so I’ll get a real kick out of all that. And the thing I’m excited about this year is I want to grow some big pumpkins for Halloween. I’ve tried them before and they’ve never worked, but this time I’ve planted them straight into my compost heap and they’re growing really well, so fingers crossed I might have some pumpkins for October.

TW:

How was it that you came to Colden then?......in ’99, how would you get here?

MM: It was because I had a friend who I was at college with, who lived in Todmorden, so I’d visited Hebden Bridge a few times and come to the area a few times to visit him, Then my sister ended up in Leeds and I wanted to be close to her, so that’s why I came here.

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ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

I was going to ask why did you come over from Ireland because I missed that bit?

MM: My dad got a job over here. My mum died when I was eight and I think my dad just wanted to make a fresh start somewhere else and of course there was the Troubles as well .There was a lot of fighting going on, and I think Ireland wasn’t a great place to be bringing up two girls on his own, so he came over to Hartlepool of all places [laughing] which was when I came over in 1970.

TW:

What did he do? What was his work?

MM: He worked for a business that made cardboard boxes; he was a sales manager selling cardboard boxes, there was a massive cardboard box factory in Hartlepool.

TW:

So you didn’t follow the family business then?

MM: I didn’t go into boxes, no [laughing] – I recycle them!

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Are you planning on selling any of your vegetables that you grow?

MM: No, I do a bit of swapping, although the campsite, do you know the little campsite down in the pub car park?

CHILDREN:

Yes.

MM: They’ve sent an e-mail out today saying ‘has anybody got any produce we can sell at the caravans. I’ve got lettuce – I don’t know whether you would want to eat lettuce when you’re camping, but I might do some of that, and the village is having a Food Festival in a couple of weeks’ time which you should all come along to . It’s at a barn at the top of Davey Lane, and people will be bringing all their own produce that they’ve grown and cooking it that day and making things and will probably be there to eat, so that’s a nice way of sharing out all the stuff we’ve got.

TW:

Are you part of any other sort of growing group or you know, organic group besides Incredible Edible?

MM: The group that’s doing the Food Festival is called the Blackshaw Food Network and that is a bunch of us getting together. Similar to the stuff that Incredible Edible does but on a much smaller scale, just saying ‘how can we do that in this little patch where

Mrs McCall 07-07-11 trans Page 14

we live?’ –A lot of people up here have got a bit of land and if they’re not using it, they could lend it or lease it to somebody who might like to grow food up here.

That just started last year and it’s just a tiny little group of people doing stuff, and we do this sort of swapping produce thing. I’m also a member of BOG which is Blackshaw Optimistic Gardeners, and that’s not just about food, that’s for people who are keen gardeners in the area and there’s lots of us.

It’s a really fantastic group and in summer we go around and visit each other’s gardens and have little bits of food to eat and a little drinkie together. In the winter we just compare notes because there are some very, very experienced gardeners there. We try to learn from each other about what’s the best way to grow things in quite tricky conditions. Up here you know, it’s wet and windy and....not warm for long enough, so it can be a challenge, but it’s good to share all that knowledge together.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Am I right – were you doing some work with willow – were you growing willow?

MM: Yes I grow willow and I sell that, and people use the willow – well you know you’ve got the willow dome in the....in the kids’ playground over there – for that kind of thing. But other people can make sculptures out of it – tunnels or different kinds of things. So I grow willow at home and I sell that usually sort of February or March every year. It’s like a weed – once you put it in it doesn’t stop.

ANOTHER PERSON:

Do you have different varieties?

MM: I don’t, no, I just have the one....mad variety that grows metres and metres in front of your eyes

TW:

So you’ve not been part of the Nut Wood group that also grow their own there?

MM: No, oh Nut Wood.....no, I’m not part of that group. I know what you mean, no, but I’m not part of it.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Are you or have you ever been a vegetarian?

MM: I’m very pro vegetarian. I eat fish, so I’ve been a fish eating, non-meat eating person since...oh I don’t know, for about 25 years or something.

ANOTHER PERSON:

Is that for any specific reason?

MM:

Mrs McCall 07-07-11 trans Page 15

Well when I started it was because I didn’t like factory farming and I didn’t like the idea of meat living in horrible conditions before it came to my plate. If I knew something was well looked after and brought up properly – I don’t mind if it’s organic or not, I just think as long as the animals are well cared for.

Actually last Christmas I had a turkey from Jonathan’s farm – he had turkey then – and that’s the first meat I’ve eaten for a long while, it’s easier to find meat now that’s from a better source

ANOTHER PERSON:

And it’s local.

MM: And it’s local, yeah. It’s the same for all non-meat eaters, the smell of a bacon sandwich can push you to the edge sometimes. [laughing] Everybody else in my family eats meat, it’s only me that doesn’t eat meat.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Would you say that you’re a good artist?

MM: Well not a good artist. I had a go – I’ve been to some art classes and done little bits. I can draw a bit but I’m not.....fab. I’m more a wordy person.

ONE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN:

Have you got a DS or anything like that?

MM: No. Kerry and Sinead have got DS’s but I’m.....not really interested. They bought me......is it Brainteaser or something.....to do on DS but I never got round to it.

TW:

Have you finished asking your questions then? Yes thank you.

TW:

Right, well I would like to say thank you very much for allowing us to talk to you.

MM: Thank you. I’ve had a lovely time, thank you.

[END OF TRACK ONE]

About Us

Wild Rose Heritage and Arts is a community group which takes it's name from the area in which we are located - the valley ("den") of the wild rose ("Heb") -  Hebden Bridge which is in Calderdale, West Yorkshire.

Get in touch

Pennine Heritage Ltd.
The Birchcliffe Centre
Hebden Bridge
HX7 8DG

Phone: 01422 844450
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