Damien Lund

Damien Lund

Interviewed on 01.01.1970

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[TRACK 1]

 

AJ CREEDY:

Okay, we’ve got Damo here who’s a local Hebden Bridge skateboarder. So….hello.

 

DAMIAN LUND:

Hello.

 

AJC:

What do you actually like about skateboarding then?

 

DL:

Well it’s not what I like, it’s what I love really. it’s…..it’s just…you can skate from anything, in fact in skateboarding you can skate from absolutely anything. If you’ve ad worries or anything, half an hour on a board and they’re completely forgot…yeah.

 

AJC:

I’m gonna have to try it.

 

DL:

Well if you want to try, it’s a good hobby but it takes….the first year of skateboarding’s the hardest and then after that, when tricks start coming, you just feel better and it’s just that buzz afterwards when you’ve been practicing for months and months, and it can be months and months, I mean I’ve been practising tricks for years and when you finally get it, it’s just like a release – a weight is off your shoulders, I mean it’s nothing, it’s just a trick that you’ve just been trying.

 

AJC:

That’s fabulous. That’s something that could be recommended to a lot of people actually, to be quite honest I think. So, what kind of skating do you actually like best?

 

DL:

Well my particular style of skateboarding is really different to everyone else’s cos you watch videos and it’s all kind of the same tricks; they’re very good tricks, but mine’s kind of old school. I’m bringing back the 1980’s and letting people know just where it started from, and it’s just all about this new school tricks which are still by far really good, but it’s the old school ways which is my

 

AJC:

Is that street skating then, or

 

DL:

It’s mainly ramp skating; ramp skating, flatland skating. I can do a lot of you know street things and annoy the public – that’s one – and you know, finding stair steps but mainly for me, it’s mainly parks, pools, pipes, flatland, but there are a lot of others such as vert, street, and all that, there’s so many different genres of skateboarding, if you want to put it that way

 

AJC:

So you sort of dip into them all a little bit?

 

DL:

You can do, after a few years of practice, yeah.

 

AJC:

Fabulous. So, what would you say were the skills needed to be a good skater?

 

DL:

The only two skills that I’d say you’d need would be balance and determination. Determination can’t often be seen as a skill, but….determination and balance is the two main skills.

 

AJC:

Brilliant. Okay, what skate parks have you actually been to?

 

DL:

I’ve been to a number of them down……around the north end of England. There’s the indoor park in Leeds which is the biggest one in the UK; they hold a lot of competitions there and have big name sponsors to take regular trips on there, then there’s the smaller ones…..in Leeds also; there’s Hyde Park – Hyde Park is the outdoor one – I’ve been to Interact in Burnley which was indoor but sadly it’s been closed due to lack of attention and lack of funding which is a bit sad really because it was a brilliant park; Clitheroe skate park – big shout out to Clitheroe skate park cos that’s amazing, I love that park so much, and there’s two parks in Huddersfield; there’s the most famous one which is Greenhead Park and also a newly built one which is Newsome Park which is just outside Huddersfield.

 

AJC:

And out of those, which would you say was the best?

 

DL:

…..I’d say Newsome, only because it’s newer. Greenhead Park needs a little bit of work doing to it.

 

AJC:

That’s the only reason then – because it’s newer?

 

DL:

Yeah, it’s bigger as well.

 

AJC:

And what do you think about Hebden Bridge skate park?

 

DL:

I love Hebden Bridge skate park. If it was up to me, I would have a tent; I would live on Hebden Bridge skate park and it would be just….yeah, ‘that is my home’

 

AJC:

So what’s good about it?

 

DL:

It’s so small…..but it’s out of the way….you’re not hassled by everyone, you know, your local drunk people, it’s…..I can’t really describe why it’s so good because it’s so small and a lot of people are complaining about the size, but I love it as it is, I mean obviously an extension would be amazing for it, but just as it is now – I love it. That’s all I can say.

 

AJC:

That’s great, that’s fantastic. Okay, do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

 

DL:

Yes.

 

AJC:

Why is that?

 

DL:

It’s just not recognised enough as a sport. It’s seen as a hobby, in fact I was speaking to an old chap in the pub, The Railway and he said ‘oh I see skateboarding as just what kids do, but seeing you carrying your board and you explaining to me how long you’ve been skateboarding for, I can see it’s a lot more’ and it is…it’s not just a thing that kids do, it can be a profession; it can be a career if you want it to be.

 

AJC:

And a passion as you say as well. A form of intense relief in your case as well which is brilliant. Lovely, so anything that can make it bigger then on the Olympic scale can only make it better and more popular then presumably?

 

DL:

Oh yeah. However if they did that, if it was an Olympic event, a lot of the pros would enter which wouldn’t really give more of a competitive side for the amateurs, because they have them in stages, you know, you’ve got your hobby and then your career and then you’ve got your amateurs and your pros and it is all divided….if you go into it as an event….but it should be an Olympic event. I would enter

 

AJC:

I’ll see what I can do; I’ll have a chat with the powers that be. I wish I could! You never know, you never know – this might do it. Would you say there’s a good skateboarding crowd?

 

DL:

There’s a fantastic skateboarding crowd in Hebden Bridge. Since….we’ve had skateboarders in this town for the best part of twenty years, and we all know each other, we all respect each other, there’s no bickering over who goes where and everyone just knows that it’s just..it isn’t…..you’re not skating for other people, you’re just skating for yourself and you’re keeping it honest and everyone knows that and just uses that and applies that and it’s part of skateboarding, everyone has a good time. We are a fantastic group; skateboarders I think are a good bunch.

 

AJC:

And you were just saying,, people have a certain amount of respect, like they let people go and take it in turns. Are there any rules and conventions would you say in skateboarding?

 

DL:

Not at skate parks. Say if you’ve only been skating for a couple of years and you see a few people on there that you know have been skating for a long time, you kind of hang back, let them use the apparatus they’re using and you use something else until they move away, or you can go over and join them if you feel you’re up for it – it’s really how you take it.

 

AJC:

Fabulous. So, famous skateboarders then – any favourite famous skateboarders?

 

DL:

Rodney Mullen. Rodney Mullen is my God. I’ve even got his autobiography at home, it’s my Bible; it’s on my bedside shelf. He’s my favourite because I base all my tricks on what he does. Also there’s the most famous one - Tony Hawk – he’s the most famous, and then

 

AJC:

Even I’ve heard of Tony Hawk

 

DL:

Everyone’s heard of Tony Hawk haven’t they? And then going back you’ve got Tony Alva you know and Stacey Peralta you know, these boys were there originally. What a lot of people are forgetting….the pros these days, Chris Haslam, Daewon Song, you know, Mike Vallely, there’s loads, but my favourite ones are the ones that no-one really talks about any more.

 

AJC:

Good stuff. What other things do you like to do other than skating?

 

DL:

…..skateboarding…..designing skate parks, but I’m not really putting them in, I just doodle….I have a keen interest in criminology. I tried at Huddersfield University for a criminology course but it didn’t really go as planned…..don’t know…..a lot of my time….a lot of my time is actually skateboarding. I’ve put nearly thirteen years into it and I don’t really have time for anything else, not even a girlfriend.

 

AJC:

Blimey. That’s serious skateboarding.

 

DL:

Oh yeah.

 

AJC:

So do you have a job?

 

DL:

I have two.

 

AJC:

Two!

 

DL:

I have two jobs. I manage to fit skateboarding around two jobs. One is….I’m a fully qualified street surf instructor which is similar to skateboarding; they’re weird boards – I wouldn’t say weird – they’re like snake boards, you’re kind of making wave movements and S shapes, and you know, it’s quite good; I see them as a training tool for those who want to do board sports but don’t really have the confidence and the balance to do so. They try on these wave boards and after half an hour they can stand on a skate board. I’ve taught a lot of kids and a lot of kids, they really love it. That’s the day job and then the night job, I’m trying to earn my keep as a barman

 

AJC:

Whereabouts are you?

 

DL:

The White Swan, Hebden Bridge local pub.

 

AJC:

I’ll call in for a pint; sounds good to me [laughing]. So how often do you like to skate, and how long would you skate for in an average session?

 

DL:

I would like to skate every day. I do manage to get in at least a couple of hours a day, but at weekends I will get up at six o’clock in the morning. Sometimes, depending what shift I’ve had the night before, but I have been known to get up at six in the morning and skate there all day till ten at night, maybe even carry it on till one o’clock in the morning, so if anyone does listen to this and realises it’s me that’s been skating at one o’clock in the morning I do apologise, but

 

AJC:

It’s dedication. I’m sure that this will help show your dedication, I’m sure. So, what kind of music do you like and skate videos as well?

 

DL:

Well, skate videos that I watch are mainly freestyle competition videos and old school videos, but…..sorry, what was the first one?

 

AJC:

Music.

 

DL:

Music…..I’m more of a heavy metal rocker if I’m honest with the world. I love heavy metal, I can’t get enough of it, but I do appreciate other forms of music, apart from pop which is not for me. I don’t do it, I don’t like it, I don’t agree with it, but no, music by real people, by real instruments, that’s good for me.

 

AJC:

Very refreshing. So no specific favourite skate video then you can think of?

 

DL:

Well my favourite one has to be a really old 411; this is going back years now. I think a lot of the new school kids might not even know what 411 is, but yeah….it’s a really old one. It’s got Rodney Mullen’s first appearance and all the other old guys, and also another one – Rubbish Heap as well, that’s a really old World Industries - Rodney Mullen back in the 80’s sessions, it was really good.

 

AJC:

Brilliant, sounds good. Good recommendation. So do you have any footage on the internet of you in action?

 

DL:

I do. I’ve been trying to find it; a lot of people have given me certain sites that it’s on but I’ve not been able to find them. I was on You Tube – you just type in ‘Damo One Foot’ and it’ll have a nineteen second clip of me attempting a really steep forty-five degree angle rail and I’m attempting a trick which no-one has ever done I don’t think. I haven’t seen it in any video I’ve watched

 

AJC:

You’ll have to find that.

 

DL:

I will have to find it. It’s on my friend Jomo’s profile, but I don’t even know if it’s actually on there or not, but I know that somewhere on You Tube there is footage of me, but I’m currently working on a video, so hopefully

 

AJC:

Oh right you are, yeah

 

DL:

Hopefully by the end of summer that should be perfected and I should hopefully get that on You Tube

 

AJC:

So do you got have any plans as to what that link’s gonna be, in advance? I know it’s unlikely

 

DL:

I’m hoping that people will just look at it and you know…..think ‘this guy’s good’ – let’s try and sponsor him, that’s the main thing; my dream in life is to have my own sponsor – be sponsored by any company, I don’t care who it is. It could be British, it could be American, Australian, it could be Italian for all I care, I just want to be sponsored and then to own and operate my own skate park, and you know, to have tuition going on, you know, having a really good environment and just having skating as part of my life as what it has been since I was eleven years old.

 

AJC:

Well Damo I sincerely hope you succeed in your dream because I think you really deserve it mate.

 

DL:

Thank you, I hope so as well.

 

AJC:

And thanks very much for your time.

 

DL:

Any time.

 

AJC:

Cheers mate, thank you.

 

DL:

No worries.

 

[END OF TRACK 1]

 

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