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  • Interviews and Storytelling: Rowan Sharp

     

    [TRACK 1]

    TW:

    Right this is Tony Wright, it’s the nineteenth of April 2011 and I’m talking to Rowan at her house on Garnet Street.  Can you tell me your full name and where and when you were born?

     

    ROWAN SHARP:

    Yeah, it’s Rowan Sharp, I was born in Babington on the Wirral in Clatterbridge Hospital…..what was the other thing?

     

    TW:

    When were you born?

     

    RW:

    Oh the fifth of the ninth 1977

     

    TW:

    Right.  What was it like growing up in the Wirral then?

     

    RS:

    Well I had two families really because my mum and dad got divorced when I was five, so my dad’s side sort of stayed up and my mum moved away and so from being with my dad in quite a rough area, I wouldn’t say too rough……nice upbringing and had whatever I wanted, quite spoilt really….and then when I used to go to my mum’s I had even more, so she used to spoil me which I am coming across as a spoilt brat but I’m not [laughing]…..and she lived just outside of Birkenhead…..east of

     

    TW:

    So not too far away

     

    RS:

    No not too far, no.

     

    TW:

    What was your family background because….were they creative people?

     

    RS:

    My nan, she was an artist….never made it but she used to….exhibit in quite a few galleries round where Wales and she is well known in a place called Barmouth.  Her paintings were very popular around that area, so she was the artist.  My tide was probably in and out of jobs.  Don’t really know what he’d done.  I think he worked in a bar but who knows…and my dad’s side, my nan worked in a Wellington factory in Manchester and my granddad was in the navy and that was my dad’s side.

     

    TW:

    How long did you live in the Wirral then?

     

    RS:

    Lived there for….till I was twenty-one then moved to Manchester, but I went to school in Chester so…..I had sort of long journeys every morning to Chester and back to go to school but I moved to Manchester, I think it was around twenty-one.

     

    TW:

    Right.  And what did you do there?

     

    RS:

    Well I….went there really to be gay and to be able to live my own life because when I was there I knew I was gay and I liked girls but I never…I couldn’t show you know that in my home town I didn’t want to sort of come out and I met a girl in Manchester and I sort of…not ran off but I moved there because I thought it would have been a lot easier with friends and family, and also to make sure that I was not wanting  you know, that sort of stigma….is that what it’s called?

     

    TW:

    So did you find what you wanted in Manchester then?

     

    RS:

     

    Yeah.  I…..I….from my education in Chester….I was always struggling because my reading and writing was horrendous so I didn’t really listen to a lot of what the teachers said and that’s probably why it was horrendous, so I didn’t come out with the best qualifications and when I moved to Manchester, from leaving school I always wanted to get into the Navy and failed the test twice because of my dyslexia which I didn’t know that I had at the time and so I left…..school, tried for the Navy, failed miserably but went to work abroad in Greece….from there I moved back after six months and then tried again for the Navy, failed and then it was just like well, you know, at that time you could only have two attempts to go for the Navy….the Wrens….don’t know what it’s like now but I just thought ‘what am I gonna do’ so I wanted to carry on with it, so I’d done a uniform service course which was to do with like public services – police, fire service, any of the armed services and then after that, that’s when I thought ‘right, sod it, I’m going to Manchester so I’m gonna do what I wanna do and just go where I wanna go and have no-one to answer to’ so went there and lived with my girlfriend and then I started cutting up clothes and making things and that’s when she sort of pushed me into applying to university, so I applied to

    Salford University and got an interview and then got straight on to the course…..and

     

    TW:

    What did you do there?

     

    RS:

    Fashion design BA….so went there and….from that went to work…straight away.  Come out of uni and went to work for Toni and Guy which is a hairdresser’s to do training to become a hairdresser which was bit bizarre, but I’d only done six months at that because I’d got very bored of talking the same old things to the customers.  The normal chit-chat’s not my thing….so….stayed there for six months and done quite a lot for the creative side of it because I used to do quite a lot of the fashion shows and stuff……and that was it.

     

    TW:

    Right.  How did you come to be in Hebden then?

     

    RS:

    I started coming to Hebden a fair few years back now…..I don’t know the actual you know, the first time that I….my first experience, what date it was but I remember it being like you know, I lived it as soon as I come here, it was just like ‘I wanna live there one day – I wanna settle down there’ and it was like ‘oh I’ve got to get there’

     

    TW:

    What was it about Hebden that you liked then?

     

    RS:

    I think it was probably because it was so gay friendly at the time you know, I don’t want to sound every things gay, but it was you know, quite a lot of lesbians live in Hebden and they’ve got children and they’ve brought their children

     

    TW:

    So it was a mixture of having that community, gay community around you but also the tolerance that other people gave – was it a mixture of those two things?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, definitely.  I think it…..just feels free and as you say a community, so it’s nice that you know, we’ve got neighbours and….you make friends easier than when you live in Manchester or a city, it’s always…..it’s hard…not many people speak to the next door neighbours whereas here, it’s lovely to be able to come and you know, make friends and have that sort of a you know, a nice sort of…cos I’ve always been a free spirit.  I’ve been all over the world, I’ve travelled miles; I’ve lived in different places; I’ve lived in a camper van for seven years so

     

    TW:

    In Britain?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, yeah.  I went over to France and then I ended up settling down in Chichester.

     

    TW:

    Right.  Did you like that lifestyle?

     

    RS:

    I love it, yeah.  As soon as I move into a house I give it a year and then I’m like ‘ah, I need to get out’

     

    TW:

    So is that why you…..you have a canal barge?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, yeah.

     

    TW:

    So you’re going to move into one of those are you?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, I upgraded so I went from the camper van….met my girlfriend….and she was doing filming in Manchester at the time I was living down south in the camper van and she was filming for ‘Cracker’ with Robbie Coltrane.  She was a police officer in that.  She was staying with my friend and I’d come to visit for the weekend and then met her and then she moved into the camper van and then we ended up going travelling in it and…..then we moved to Wales to be where my mum now lives…a very gypsy lifestyle [laughing]…moved to Wales and stayed there for a year trying to sell wholefoods to farmers that just wanted meat which didn’t go down too well – I was trying to push the spices and pulses and they didn’t even know what it was, but we got fed up after living there for a year; we moved to Manchester for a year and then to Hebden.

     

    TW:

    So how long have you actually been in Hebden then?

     

    RS:

     

     

    For about…I think it’s about a year and six months now, maybe longer – I’m not too good with dates.

     

    TW:

    You’re actually working with Geoff Garner, the leather man now.  How did that happen?

     

    RS:

    Well when I was……at uni, I’ve always wanted to carry on with fashion design because of having the camper van and not being able to have all the machinery and having too much stuff, it’s never been able to happen and even though I have always made things, hand-sewn things……I thought ‘right, I’m gonna do what I want to do’ because I’m thirty three now, thirty one and a half or however old, and I just thought ‘sod it, I’m just gonna move to Hebden and do something that I want to do – work part-time and just’………..you know, I met Geoff from coming walking in Hebden, so I knew that I wanted to do leather because I’d made some things out of leather and….people, that I’ve made for people, and they’ve said to me that I should really concentrate on that kind of career instead of anything else, so I ended up finding Geoff and he was like for three years going ‘are you coming in yet?’ and every time I was just like ‘yeah’ and wanting to get here.  I eventually got to Hebden a year and a half ago now and started part-time with a photography company up in Cragg Vale and so I started there and I was starting to go in to Geoff and then the boss at Cragg Vale said that he wanted me there full-time, so then again I got onto that bloody treadmill just like some full-time photography studios and I was there for….it was a year, and I ended up going on holiday and just thinking ‘I’ve moved to Hebden to do something that I really wanted to do and I’m just going to take me on this path again, you know, all for money, whereas really I’d live in a tent and do something that I’m passionate about, so I decided to just give it all up and got back from Amsterdam, and decided that I wasn’t gonna turn in for three days and I hid in my bedroom for three days and pretended I’d got stuck in Amsterdam which was a mini lie, but it was the only way that I could actually tell him in a nice way that I didn’t want to get back, because for those three days I was supposed to go into work and then I was going to Mykonos in Greece, so I ended up just not turning in for the three days and then went to Mykonos and came back and then went off sick, and then I thought ‘it’s about time that I sort of went in and said’ you know ‘I don’t wanna work here any more’ and so I went in and anyway….yeah, that was the end

     

    TW:

    So what do you actually do with Geoff then?

     

    RS:

    Started with him going in two days and just absolutely loved it and especially him, working with him, it’s just….he’s an amazing guy……when I started I was just doing basic simple patterns for bags and now hopefully he’ll say as well that I’ve improved; I sort of put my hand to anything and help him out with his repairs, he shows me how to do patterns, leather carving I’ve got into, so everything really with him, so I’ve actually been in Hebden for about two years because I’d been with him for nearly a year in October – August - a year in August, but just whatever you know is there, I’ll help out.  It is only voluntary because you know

     

    TW:

    Is it like an apprenticeship in a way?

     

    RS:

    Definitely yeah, he took me under his wing as well you know, call him my surrogate father [laughing] but no, he’s just started from the basics and given me his time, and that’s why I help him out as well you know, because he’s very, very busy even though when I first started I thought…..cos it’s so….I call it a cave in there and as you know, it’s freezing cold, but I didn’t think that he’d get so many customers but he knows everyone in Hebden and they all go to him, and he is absolutely what I’d say amazing as a designer and maker, and the things the he’s done and what I’ve seen is just brilliant, he could just wipe the floor with any of the big designers anyway, I’m sure.

     

    TW:

    What kind of work do you like best out of all that then?

     

    RS:

    Well……..probably the leather carving I like the look of, but I do also like…you know, making the bags and I’ve even loved doing the repairs, so everything really, I just love everything, it’s just all really good but as well, because he’s got the patience of a saint, so he….you know, looks after me and just shows me everything and I’m not the quickest of learners, so he’s just special really

     

    TW:

    I believe you’re going to college to study something.  What is it you’re going to study?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, it’s Leather Design and the full title is BA Honours Leather Accessories and Products, and it’s in London, part of the London College of Fashion, it’s called Wanas, so I start that in September and

     

    TW:

    Is that three or four years, is it?

     

    RS:

    It’s for three years.  It’s pretty prestigious, I was quite  lucky to get on to it, well so I’ve been told.  Having Jimmy Choo as a lecturer you know, he’s doing well isn’t he?

     

    TW:

    I don’t know about the leather world to be quite honest.  You can tell me about it.

     

    RS:

    I don’t know much about sort of his background but I know that he went to Cordwainers I think in the eighties, and he now makes shoes for all the rich and famous people. If you own a pair of Jimmy Choo’s I think they cost around anything from two hundred up to thousands of pounds.  He is really…I know that quite a lot of the people that have gone to this university have made it….Patrick Cox, Jimmy Choo, Emma Hope, and so it is, when you’ve been there, I think it is pretty prestigious, like you can come out and be proud if you get the degree really.

     

    TW:

    So would it be shoes that you were thinking about trying to learn how to do, or other kinds of you know, clothing or what would you like

     

    RS:

    Well that would be giving my ideas away wouldn’t it? [laughing]  You’ll have to wait and see, so in three years’ time I’ll maybe invite you to my catwalk, but no, I want to definitely get into the carving, but I want to do leather carving with a twist…..and with amazing details which no-one’s actually done, I’ve not seen it.  I’ve seen other carving done but not in a way that I’ve got in my head, so it is gonna be

     

    TW:

    So you have a kind of vision of where you’re going then?

     

    RS:

    Oh definitely yeah, I’m going places.

     

    TW:

    Excellent.

     

    RS:

    So…..it’s gonna be a journey, but I’m gonna make it.

     

    TW:

    Good.  Well, when you finish, are you going to come back to Hebden do you think or you just don’t know?

     

    RS:

    Definitely, definitely want to live here and settle down here and I thought when I moved here two years ago that I would have…..this wouldn’t have happened, and I thought that I would have ended up just working with Geoff and working part-time, and just staying put, but because I’ve been working with Geoff and really getting my teeth into it, I do want to see the other side of it as well, so more of the business and the marketing side.  Geoff went to the same university in the seventies so his lecturer when I went for the interview is still there, so that’s gonna be….when I meet him anyway, I’ve got a lot of stories to tell him, but it’s……that’s why I think I’ve sort of gone on that path because I know that a lot of people have gone there and have come out with an absolutely amazing qualification, and from what Geoff’s done and what, you know, he’s been saying that this lecturer in particular talked to Geoff, really talked to him, and he said that his amazing leather, he goes all round the world you know, with his leather, teaching….he goes to different conferences and stuff, so  that’s why I thought ‘right, I’m gonna give it a try’ and out of five thousand applicants, twenty five places, so…..

     

    TW:

    You’ve obviously got something about you

     

    RS:

    Thank you!

     

    TW:

    Do you know about the….like the history of leather then?

     

    RS:

    No.

     

    TW:

    Is that something that you’d like to get into?

     

    RS:

    Definitely, yeah, and that’s what’s taught on this course.  Geoff knows a lot about it but because I want to sort of sink my teeth in as soon as I go in, you know, he knows everything about…..there is to know I think, but on this course, it teaches me the history…..the making, tanneries, overseas, in different leathers…..there’s an awful lot of writing in the actual brief but I’m not bothered to read it, so I’m just going to go and….just give it the best

     

    TW:

    So you have this sort of vision of doing carving and that sort of thing that you’ve mentioned earlier, but you also talk about like the marketing and that side of it.  When you finish the degree, would you be looking to just be a maker and maybe work for somebody else, or would you like to start up your own business?

     

    RS:

    No I’m gonna definitely start up my own business…..my label…..I’ve got in my mind what I want to do and where I’m going and….I’ve pissed about for so long now doing different stuff, I think now is the time to put all my knowledge and history and everything I’ve done, I don’t know what the word is, but…….just life skills really, into practice and to do it, to stick to it, and to…..get something out of it.  If I do make it then I’m not just gonna you know….hopefully if I do make it I’m not just gonna take take take, I want to be able to do you know, fundraising and charity work and be able to let the business run itself, and me spend time doing charity stuff and even if that is with leather, you know, going giving people shoes and things like that

     

    TW:

    Well I was thinking about that side of it because you’ve travelled quite a bit you said, and if you started your own business, would it be like an international business because I know Geoff, basically he’s got his workshop in a small town in the north of England but he’s very busy and he ticks over.  How would you view that?  Would that kind of set up, you know, suit you or do you have a broader kind of horizon that you’d kind of want to

     

    RS:

    I’d like that, but maybe when I’m you know…..cos I think what Geoff’s got is absolutely lovely.  He’s got a real strong group of friends, family, everything is based in Hebden and I would like that for myself, but I am a free spirit and I do get itchy feet, so it’s a case of….if I did do that, then I don’t know where the business would go.  I think I’m just gonna at the time, when I finish uni, move back to Hebden then try and do things over the net and if I have to go places then I will, but because I don’t know how I’m gonna do the marketing side of it……I’ve had things that I could….you know, my leather corsets, I could have sold them a thousand times to shops in Manchester, but I was just…..free spirit and never really pulled my finger out, so…..I’m really gonna concentrate on it and I reckon I probably would end up just going where the work is really, and try and get instead of however many zeros minus in my bank [laughing]

     

    TW:

    So in a sense you see yourself in a way, almost like an all-rounder rather than a specialist.  Even though leather is a specialist subject in the whole of fashion, you want to be able to use leather in as many ways as possible, would that be right?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, definitely.  The collection that I’ve got in mind, which hopefully for my third year show I’ll be able to do all the carvings into my design, and no matter if that’s something to wear, bags, purses, computer bags, shoes…..cos I might even get there because I’ve never made a pair of shoes, I might really enjoy it, so….and I know that, you know, a lot of sort of designers start off and they’ll get the designs and they’ll ship it off to you know, all over the world to get manufactured, so I really don’t know what’s gonna happen because I do actually like the hands-on, so I think I would have to be somewhere where I could have hands-on, make prototypes and get it made, just gonna see….

     

    TW:

    Right.  I was gonna ask about the design side.  I mean what kind of influences do you have in your design work?

     

    RS:

    I like……my chosen designer is a guy called Robert Stark and its ‘Chrome Hearts’.  When I went to Vegas, I won a trip to Vegas, which was very random.  I do quite a bit of promotion work as well, and it was for the Glam Booth 2000 and it was 2001 or something….and it was…oh God….I’ll have to ask Danny that actually.  [calling out] ‘Dan…..Danni…..what year did we go to Vegas?’…..anyway, we won this trip to Vegas and

     

    Danni:

    2008

    RS:

    2008, that’s how shit I am at dates…..away with the fairies……2008 I was doing this competition and it was for a casino in Manchester and I had to get people in to have this experience within five minutes and you got this glam makeover, so they done your hair, make-up, and it was from the…..sounds awful…..from the ugliest picture, to the most attractive, the transition, so anyway I was doing it for two days which was in Manchester and the trip was to Vegas, you won a trip, all paid for, Caesar’s Palace, the lot, and I phoned Dan up on the sly, and I was like ‘Dan, come really ugly, don’t put any make-up on, come really really rough and…..make sure not to put a really nice top on, your hoodie, just come and just look scruffy’ and I told her what it was about, and she come, and she had the makeover and the guy took the photo and she left, and I had to pretend I didn’t know her…..and the guy rang up and was ‘oh my God, did you see her?’ and with Dan being a model anyway you know, it was like ‘well….no, no’…..’oh my God she’s gorgeous, look at that’ and I was like ‘God, yes, she’s really gorgeous’   ‘want that holiday?’….so we went to Vegas and that’s when I’d seen this really good leather designer and his ‘Chrome Hearts’ .

     

    TW:

    And what kind of stuff did he do?

     

    RS:

    He’s Karl Largeld’s side-kick I think, sort of….side-kick, and…..biker, but wearable bike stuff, so it’s like got a twist, it’s you know, not all the padded stuff, but it’s sort of

     

    TW:

    More casual is it?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, yeah, more casual and wearable and walking around with leathers on, and he does a lot of silver – he incorporates silver into his leather

     

    TW:

    Oh right, real silver then?

     

    RS:

    Yeah, yeah, there’s thousands of pounds of leather things to buy there, so I really like his stuff and….my own really, [laughing] Geoff’s as well…..gotta say that!

     

    TW:

    So when are you moving away?

     

    RS:

    Well that’s the thing.  Whenever my boat is ready to sail, cos I’m gonna be living on that, so we rent this place, it’s lovely, but we haven’t told the landlady yet we’re moving so….I think she quite likes us living here, but it will probably be July, August, ready to start uni in September, but I don’t know how long it’s gonna take us to sail to London.  It took us three months to sail one boat from London to Manchester, that was out first boat, then we sold that and made quite a lot of money on it, then bought another one, sold that and made a lot of money on it, and then we’ve just bought this one now, so we’re sailing that to London and we’re gonna live on it. Yes, being a gypsy I think!

     

    TW:

    I wanted to ask you a sort of a general kind of question really, about sort of the Upper Valley, Hebden Bridge and Todmorden and this area.  What’s your perception of like the creative side of things here?  What things have you experience on the creative side?

     

    RS:

    Well because I’ve been living in sort of a bubble with doing photography and going to Geoff’s, I’m not seeing a lot of other stuff but I know that I’ve been to a lot of the galleries when they have the open gallery days and a really good artist called Paula Rego, amazing stuff, she had a lot her prints up in Linden Mill I think…….and I felt that to have her work you know, in sort of a little run down mill, I say run down but I would have thought it would have been you know, London somewhere or got lost in Manchester, Liverpool, but I think it’s good, I think they have a lot going on, like that much that you can be busy every single day.

     

    TW:

    Would anybody like Paula Rego, the kind of work that she does, would that influence you in the kind of ideas you come up with for clothing?

     

    RS:

    Definitely, yeah.  Her designs…..her artwork is….crazy, well, it’s quite sinister…..a lot of the stuff in it, her illustrations, I’d love her to be my illustrator, that’s all I can say

     

    TW:

    Yeah, because she uses like folklore and myth and that sort of thing as well.  Do you know anything about the local stuff around here?

     

    RS:

    No I don’t.   I’ve been sort of like ignorant, not on purpose, but just because I have been in this bubble of just…..when I was working in Prodoto it was just du, du, du,….and now I’m with Geoff and two dogs, so I’ve not, which I would like to if I was here full-time I’d probably get more involved

     

    TW:

    But could you see your work going in that direction in the sense that a lot of the stuff you’ve been talking about, it’s incredibly visual impact stuff, but I was going to say the more literal side of things.  Do you think some of your designs might be….you could develop them as a kind of design folio of stuff that was based on stories or literary things rather than just visuals.

     

    RS:

    Yeah possibly, I think it’s cos I’m not very, you know, I read but I’m not into….when I was at school it was like…..I never really got into reading and writing so I’ve struggled really

     

    TW:

    But it could be sort of music or listening to things on the radio, I mean could that influence you at all?

     

    RS:

    Oh yeah, music definitely does depending on what CD I’m listening to when I’m making something. It can turn out…..totally something else from listening to pieces of music……and yeah, quite possible.  I’ve not really sort of…..

     

    TW:

    What kind of music do you like then?

     

    RS:

    Kate Bush.

     

    TW:

    [laughing] What, Kate Bush and only Kate Bush?

     

    RS:

    No, I listen to a lot of…..different music really.  I couldn’t say that I like one type of music; anything other than pop shit what I call….I’m not really into the latest….but I’ve got quite a good, you know, so me good artists…I like the old stuff….Al Stewart and Kate Bush……and a band called Tombeck..my iPod’s rammed but…..

     

    TW:

    There is a sort of theory that, you know, music and the visual arts are sort of connected to through theory and some music seems very sort of spidery and linear, and others, it’s like big broad brushes of colour and the colours are very subtle, like very tonal kind of themes, and I just wondered like, when you say you were doing a leather carving, the colours that you might, apart from the design, but any colours that you inlaid or anything, could that be inspired by anything other than just a very visual sort of sign?

     

    RS:

    Yeah definitely.  Because I am only learning carving at the moment, I want to get you know, some practice and it’s just time to do it….but I am hoping to be able to do….like what Geoff can do, he can carve anything into it and use different colours and dyes you know, it’s just a case of experimenting, but it is quite an expensive thing to experiment with; if you go wrong it’s not like a canvass that you can just wipe over, so I am….when I sort of start the carving, I always feel because I’m not the best yet, well not at all, but it’s gonna take time for me to master it, and to use pieces of leather which is money, you know…..hopefully I can have more time to spend on it and I’ll become much better at it in a few years, and then I’ll probably end up experimenting with all different things, but because I’m thirty four at the moment, it’s

     

    TW:

    Are you going to have to take out all these loans to go?

     

    RS:

    Yeah.  Another thousands and thousands and thousands of pounds, but yes, I’m already in debt with the first lot

     

    TW:

    It’s not gonna be easy is it?

     

    RS:

    No it’s not, but you only live once and hopefully I’ll pay them back one day when I’ve made my millions.

     

    TW:

    I’d just like to ask, is there anything you’d like to say about leather work or about Hebden Bridge, something I’ve not asked or you know, some perception that you have about the area – is there anything you’d like to say about it that I haven’t asked about?

     

    RS:

    I think the area is absolutely amazing and very, very creative.  It’s very safe, I feel really safe here and that’s another thing that I really like, because going to London, it’s…you know, so bloody big, but…..not got to go there, but it’s something that….I’ve never lived in London, but just giving it a try, but I think Hebden is…it’s just….special really, it’s a find, definitely…a gold mine!

     

    TW:

    Do you relate to the landscape around here at all?

     

    RS:

    Oh yeah, I love….I do quite a bit of running with my dogs….I love getting out into the Crags and going up, like yesterday I was going up the Pike, this morning I jogged to Mytholmroyd, tomorrow it will probably be the Crags, and even going further afield…Holmefirth, it’s absolutely breath-taking.  I love Wales as well, I’m really old-fashioned about Wales because I was sort of brought up there, my mum and my nan, being Welsh, but being in Wales it was really secluded and isolated and there’s not a lot of work, and…Hebden is so close to Manchester, so close to Leeds, it’s just an absolutely perfect area, and brilliant for dogs.  Danny doesn’t want to move and if it was up to her, we’d end up you know, staying here, and she applied to Huddersfield, Wimbledon and London College of Fashion, and she got into all three so she’s had a big thing to….because she found out that she got into Wimbledon and she’s going to do costume design in Wimbledon, and for her to have got into all three, that’s you know, something else

     

    TW:

    Will the two of you collaborate do you think?

     

    RS:

    Definitely. That’s gonna be….yeah, we’re gonna do some twists I think, so you know, she’s probably one of the best embroiderers I’ve ever seen; she can do everything.  She’s learning to do gold work

     

    TW:

    That’s fascinating

     

    RS:

    Yeah, she’s really really good, and really good at knitting as well, so she’s done it from a child even though she was sort of on tour all her life with Riverdance, she just used to knit and embroider on the coach and wherever….she’s done quite a lot in the Far East, so she just used to take it with her and do bits and pieces, and now she’s…..brilliant.

     

    TW:

    Do you think some of the collaborative work then could, if the two of you worked together, could it be for you know, stage sets, theatre, or other kinds of…..you know, performance-based things?

     

    RS:

    Yeah

     

    TW:

    Or would it just be kind of the fashion world that you would be aiming at?  Or maybe a bit of both?

     

    RS:

    Yeah.  I wouldn’t say ‘no’ – I know that would work because she’s starting the same time as me and we are definitely going to work together on it, so we hope to get a studio in London and – this is all very new because she has only just…..Wimbledon phoned, well, it was UCAS that got in touch at six o’clock this morning, so it’s all very new but we have spoke about it and I think she’s gonna end up you know, either living on my boat or we’ll buy two boats and we’ll get a studio…..or…..she wants me to sell the boat and live in a house [laughing] but I don’t wanna do that.  I’ve been in there for how long now and it’s like ‘get me out’ but…yeah, definitely, we could…..definitely work together

     

    TW:

    Yeah, that sounds fascinating

     

    RS:

    It’s gonna be, especially in three years’ time, we’ll both gonna be in our third year for our final pieces, we’re both gonna really hammer it and we’re a lot older and….wiser

     

    TW:

    Let’s just stop for a second

     

    TW:

    I’m just wondering if there’s anything else to discuss….I think we’ll call it quits there if that’s alright

     

    RS:

    Yeah no problem

     

    TW:

    Okay.

    [END OF TRACK 1]

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About Us

Wild Rose Heritage and Arts is a community group which takes it's name from the area in which we are located - the valley ("den") of the wild rose ("Heb") -  Hebden Bridge which is in Calderdale, West Yorkshire.

Get in touch

Pennine Heritage Ltd.
The Birchcliffe Centre
Hebden Bridge
HX7 8DG

Phone: 01422 844450
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