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  • Interviews and Storytelling: William Sunderland and George Oliver

    [TRACK 1]

     

    AJ CREEDY:

    We’ve got William and George who are local Hebden Bridge skaters; hi guys.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Alright.

     

    AJC:

    How are you doing?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Not bad, just chilling on the park as always really.

     

    AJC:

    I know, it’s a wonderful day for it to be quite honest. So, what do you like about skateboarding you two?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    ….I don’t know….I just like the feeling of like landing tricks, and I’ve been doing it for a while now, so….progressing and just chilling out with my mates really, cos we all do it together.

     

    Yeah, basically mates really, cos we’ve got like a big friendship group and we all do it together and it’s just a good way of kind of self-expressing cos it’s all about kind of, it’s a personal thing, it’s just you doing it, it’s not like a team sport, so it’s just something for you to do, but….and then doing it with your friends is just as good.

     

    There’s kind of like a little bit of friendly competition as well for like tricks and stuff. The first one to get a trick, and there’ll be the odd game with skaters all going down somewhere.

     

    AJC:

    It sounds good. So, what kind of skating do you both like best?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Well I usually stick to skate parks to be honest. I haven’t done stairs or anything like that in a while, but when the park gets extended, hopefully I’ll be jumping down the stairs. No street skating or anything.

     

    I like it all to be honest, I respect every aspect and part of skating, like the vert skaters and stuff, you see the videos of what they’re doing

     

    It’s just mental some of the stuff, there’s so many different variations.

     

    And like street skaters is just as hard as what they’re doing. It’s unreal a lot of it. I try doing bits of all of it, try it all really.

     

    AJC:

    What skills do you think you need to be a good skater?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Balance…..

     

    Co-ordination

     

    Strong legs maybe. Mind you I haven’t got the strongest of legs to be honest.

     

    No, I’d say the same to be honest.

     

    It’s a lot to do with guts to be honest.

     

    Having the kind of will to not mind putting yourself on the line. It’s the kind of determination of wanting to do it so much that you put yourself on the line. It is hard to do it, cos like you know, there’s been times when we’ve been in Leeds and stuff, skating stairs, I know I personally have rode up to a set of stairs countless times, not done it, just get to it and then think ‘I’m not doing that’ but then the determination makes you go back and try it again, then you get up to it and you don’t want to do it again

     

    Nerves get the better of you sometimes

     

    AJC:

    It’s bound to do, I mean I’ve seen what some of you guys do, I mean when we were in Scotland, I mean it scared the hell out of me, and I was only filming, so yeah, I know exactly what you’re saying. So, what skate parks have you been to? I know I’ve just mentioned Scotland, there’s quite a few up there aren’t there?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Oh God, well yeah there’s Scotland; I’ve been down south once or twice, skated a few skate parks down there, and yeah well, they all stick to the same kind of rule but obviously a lot of parks have different flows and different obstacles to skate. I’ve lost count of how many skate parks I’ve been to now.

     

    Yeah, it’s like we go to Leeds Hyde Park a lot don’t we really cos it’s good is Hyde cos it’s got everything – there’s like mini ramps and then big ramps and then blocks and rails, there’s pretty much everything there and it’s not too far away, but going down London’s quite good as well. There’s South Bank which is….I mean it’s good cos it’s more street than like a park, I mean it’s basically a street spot that’s just designed for skaters which is really good. It’s like, you don’t get kicked off or anything like that, it’s just for skaters and it’s like skating in the street which is really good. I’ve skated there a few times which is good.

     

    I’ve never been to South Bank, but hopefully I’ll get the chance to go.

     

    AJC:

    So what about….which one would be your favourite then?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Well the skate park that I went to in Cornwall called Truro Skate Park

     

    Oh yeah, Truro

     

    That was a really nice skate park because it was like smooth and it flowed and it had a hell of a lot of variety, so….yeah, there was a lot of things to do….practising, there’s a lot of different stages, so if you learn a trick on something smaller you can take it up to something bigger and just go up basically.

     

    I’d say for me Prissick Plaza, it’s just insane, it’s just got everything there

     

    AJC:

    Where’s that?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    It’s down Middlesbrough.

     

    AJC:

    I think you did well just pronouncing that.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Is it Middlesbrough?

     

    Yeah, Prissick’s in Middlesbrough and then there’s a skate plaza in Stoke as well

     

    I think that’s the one I went to, I don’t think I went to Prissick then, I went to the one in Stoke cos it’s near to where my grandma lives. Maybe it wasn’t Prissick, but anyway whichever one it was

     

    AJC:

    It was good

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah it was good

     

    AJC:

    What do you think to Hebden Bridge Skate Park then?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    …well, it’s a bit small, but you know, it’s got the stuff that you need to learn your basic tricks really, like the half pipe and the grind box and stuff. It’s got the basics but it just needs that kind of aspect of stepping up to bigger things to learn better things on bigger things as well.

     

    Yeah, I mean, I do like Hebden Skate Park, I mean a lot of it’s to do with the people and stuff cos everyone’s really nice round here and it’s a good atmosphere

     

    It’s a big community really and everyone knows each other

     

    Yeah, all the obstacles are good, I mean they’ve got everything that you really skate in, well with skateboarding and stuff, but there’s just not varieties of the different obstacles, it’s just like the same, like you come down and you skate the same things cos there isn’t too much to do but it’s good….it’s good to skate.

     

    AJC:

    So if you were gonna pick just one good point about Hebden Bridge Skate Park, what would it be?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Well I like the grind box to be honest, I stick to that

     

    Yeah the box, it’s a nice height and length

     

    Probably cos it’s the smallest thing as well, so it doesn’t take as much like nerves to try

     

    Yeah it’s good to learn

     

    Probably the most womanly thing to be trying

     

    AJC:

    Most womanly thing to be trying – I like it!

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    It’s kind of like not too small, but when you skate that and you learn summat on there you can’t take it up to anything big, but it’s small enough to learn on then be able to do it on bigger stuff; it’s like the perfect height really.

     

    AJC:

    So do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    I think it should be personally. I think it’s takes a lot of like practice and effort, probably just as much as the other Olympic sports, so yeah, why not?

     

    I would say maybe not Olympic cos there are just skateboarding competitions that are extreme sports, like X games and stuff which I think is good because it’s like….you know, you just get extreme sports and I think it’s better that way. I don’t know that it should be an Olympic sport, but it’s definitely….it’s as good as any other sports in the Olympics, I’m not saying that, but I don’t think it should be included in the Olympic sports category if you get me.

     

    AJC:

    It might just make it too commercial and you’d end up witht people turning up with those strange horns like they do have in the World Cup at the moment, like a swarm of bees. You don’t want that do you?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    No, it’s good as it is now cos it’s an extreme sport, to kind of…….like competition, you still get just extreme sports fans, so it’s like still on its own

     

    Well it’s got its own different like categories I suppose

     

    Yeah, is it’s in its own little thing which is good. I think it’s better like that.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant. So, I mean you’ve already said some of it, but is there a good skateboarding crowd would you say generally?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah……depends where you go really, I mean I think Hebden’s got a great like skating community cos everyone knows each other and everyone just chills out really, it’s a relaxed place to skate.

     

    Yeah, but if you’re going somewhere else like Leeds say, there’s a lot of different like people that…different groups of friends I’d say, whereas everyone at Hebden knows each other really.

     

    Yeah. It’s never really been to a park where there’s been trouble or anything has there really? It’s like there’s different friendship groups, but because they’re all skaters they all get along, but you know, it’s not just that one big group

     

    They’ve all got one thing in common so you can always guarantee friendship

     

    Yeah it’s kind of like every skateboarder respects each other, even if they’re not friends they just respect the fact that they’re part of the skateboarding.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, so as you go round would you say there’s any rules and conventions?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Not really, I mean….it’s like if you went to a skate park and you were like having a go at all the rest of the skaters, then they’d all as one like congregate against you because they’d all be on one side

     

    That’s just like community spirit though, they’re just sticking up for each other

     

    Then again there aren’t many skaters who would come and do that, because again, they respect each other so it’s a good sport

     

    Most people get along

     

    AJC:

    So there’s a lot of respect.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    So, famous skateboarders. Have you got any favourites?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    P-Rod.

     

    Paul Rodriguez.

     

    Mine and Will’s favourite.

     

    Yeah, well there’s a lot.

     

    Chris Cole….there’s like a few old skaters as well, and new skaters coming up every now and then that are very talented. It’s like you’ve got all the big name skateboarders that pretty much all skateboarders know about, like Paul Rodriguez and people like him, but then you get like just the amateurs, like even just Mike Wright, you know

     

    Some of the amateurs that are just like…not as well known can just be as good

     

    Yeah, they’re just as good but they’re not as well known, but we kind of know they’re just as good and it’s like

     

    It’s just cos they haven’t got their name out yet and they don’t get board sales

     

    Yeah it’s good looking….like watching the amateurs and comparing them to these like famous skaters, cos sometimes you see like an amateur will do a trick and you’ll think ‘I bet even Paul Rodriguez or someone wouldn’t be able to do that’ and it’s just good seeing that cos you think it’s good for him really.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous. So, what other things do you both do apart from skating? And I know you do a lot of skating.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    To be honest there isn’t much else. If I’m not here I’ll be sat at home either playing on a game or something, or on Facebook to be honest.

     

    Yeah, well I’ve got quite a lot of other things that I do really

     

    Well you play football and stuff

     

    Yeah, football mainly and there’s like cricket and stuff, and I play the guitar, so it’s kind of a problem really for skating cos I just find it hard to put in the practice, you know, I won’t skate for like a couple of weeks cos I’m tied up with doing other things and I’ll come down and people will have like five new tricks, and I’m just ‘what – everyone’s just getting better’ so it is kind of good to see everyone getting better than me’ but it’s kind of a problem, it’s like if I didn’t have anything else to do and I just skated all the time I think I would probably be better at it, but

     

    AJC:

    Variety’s the spice of life evidently, so….unless you’re making a curry

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Well there’s a hell of a lot of variety in Hebden Bridge

     

    AJC:

    So, do you both have jobs?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    No

     

    I was looking for one but it’s hard

     

    AJC:

    Everyone says that.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    A job would be good if I got the chance

     

    AJC:

    I should start a little job centre because I’ve had the same answer from everybody so far [laughing]

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    I’ve been looking for one but….well, I say I’ve been looking for one, I’ve never actually gone in to a shop, but yeah, I do want one.

     

    AJC:

    But you’re still looking?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Your eyes are open and there’s jobs out there, allegedly.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah, I just couldn’t be bothered to do them though really.

     

    AJC:

    I know what you’re saying.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    I’m very lazy, I’ve got to say. At least I’m honest about it! [laughing]

     

    AJC:

    So, how often do you both skate and how long would you skate for in an average session?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Normally it would be about four hours a day. In the weekend maybe about seven or eight in the day.

     

    Yeah it depends, I mean we’ve been to Leeds before and we’ve set off at like ten in the morning and then got back at like eight, nine, sometimes even later, so it just depends what the day’s like and what everyone’s feeling like. Usually on like a cold day, it’s never really the same kind of atmosphere. You get there and it’s a bit cold and it’s a bit dingy, and it’s not really the same as like a nice summer’s day in Leeds and yeah, if it’s a summer’s day I stay out all day pretty much, so it depends

     

    AJC:

    I think Damo was actually pushing for some floodlights, I think he actually had to go to bed though

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah he wanted floodlights, cos it’s like school takes up most of the day, and like in winter, you get back from school at like four and then you come down, it’s dark by half six and it’s like ‘oh great, I haven’t had time to skate’ – that’s a bit annoying, so it would be good to have floodlights, very good

     

    AJC:

    See what we can do

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Hint, hint!

     

    AJC:

    You never know, you never know. So, what about music then? What kind of music do you like and skate videos as well; have you got any particular favourite skate videos?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Well I listen to a lot of hip hop, rap, the occasional rock, classic rock; I listen to a lot of music to be honest. Dubstep, drum and bass, all of them

     

    Yeah I’m kind of the same really but I’d say if there was one favourite, it would be rock music and kind of indie rock music, but I do listen to like hip hop as well and other stuff. There’s some good hip hop that I really like and then yeah, there’s drum and bass which I quite like. It’s just….I don’t know, it’s things like…..like….don’t know….dance music I can’t stand cos it doesn’t have anything to it, it’s just like

     

    AJC:

    [incomp]

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah, like hip hop and rock music, it actually takes talent to produce and compose and actually play, whereas dance music’s just…you sometimes find it’s some loser who’s on a computer, just putting loads of random sounds together.

     

    The thing is a lot of like different variations of music you see in a lot of different like genres of skating, like you’ll get skaters that skate like just half pipes and like big old school bowls and stuff, and they’ll all listen to like the old music, like rock and stuff, and then all the new kind of street skaters will listen to like a bit of hip hop and a bit of rap, and it’s like

     

    It kind of depends on what category of skating you’re in, but like I say cos I like to do quite a lot of it, it’s a lot of different music styles….yeah I just like anything that I can tell has taken a lot of talent to produce and it sounds good.

     

    Skating and music just go together to be honest. There’s a lot of skating and music like collaborations you could say as well; a lot of music about skating.

     

    It’s like the worst thing when someone just doesn’t like a song or something just because it doesn’t fall in to their favourite style of music, it’s just like can’t you just see that it’s good music

     

    I mean even if you don’t like a certain style of music you’ve got to like respect the fact that someone else might and they’ve put a lot of effort to get the music – produced it

     

    It takes talent, that’s the main thing

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely, and it fits skateboarding as well. What about videos then? Is there any particular favourite skateboard video?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    For me, definitely the DC video.

     

    Oh that’s classic.

     

    First time I watched that and I never got over how good it is – it’s amazing.

     

    Consistency – in skate videos you see a lot of consistency.

     

    I was going to say on the DC video it’s good cos there’s all the street skaters cos DC do a lot of street skaters, and then there’s a part at the end about Danny, a vert skater, and he breaks two world records or something, and they just show all these like helicopter clips of it, and it just merges into all this street skating and suddenly into this guy breaking like this jump record, and you just think ‘oh that’s totally different to what I’ve just seen’ – it’s amazing, it’s really good

     

    AJC:

    How high is that jump then?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    It’s like fifteen metres or something

     

    It’s ramp to ramp though, it’s like a ramp down, ramp up, like a launch ramp and then a landing ramp and then a quarter pipe just to like soak up the speed that you get from the jump

     

    It’s like fifteen metres high or something

     

    Maybe not fifteen metres high…it’s like thirty metres long…it’s massive basically, I can’t remember the actual things

     

    The thing about the DC video though is the fact that it kind of set the standard for skate films, like it was one of the first skate films of like technicolour street skating and like a mix of all different types of skating, and that kind of set the standard for other skate videos, and other skate videos generally just get better and better as years go on because people just progress. The next best thing would probably be Lakai Fully Flared, that’s the biggest thing that’s come out recently compared to the DC videos, so they’re probably the two favourites for me.

     

    You see you get a lot of videos as well, like…videos that they don’t advertise as much that have a lot of different types of skating, like Heel Toe Magic which is like a British skating film and Mike’s in as well, he’s got a section, but they didn’t advertise it as much as they should have done, so it didn’t get out there as much but it’s a great skate film, so advertising as well – commercialism.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant. So, what about yourselves? Have you got any footage on the internet?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah I have; George has as well. Marcus does quite a lot of the filming for us because he’s into filming, so usually when we’re in Leeds and stuff he’ll take his camera and then if any of us do anything good, he’ll just say ‘oh do you want it filmed?’ and we’ll say ‘yeah’ so we just get clips together and then make little videos, and put them on You Tube and stuff.

     

    AJC:

    So is there a link for any of these clips?

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Yeah I’m sure there’ll be one on Marcus’s Facebook somewhere

     

    They’re all on his You Tube channel

     

    Yeah on his You Tube channel

     

    Marcus Windrum Wheeler - check it out

     

    Yeah, they’re usually just like five minute long videos of just like kind of recent stuff we’ve done, like putting it into like months and then it’ll be like five minutes long and then he’ll bring out another one in the next couple of months

     

    I think he’s making a big one as well – like the end of his year he’s just gonna gather up all the footage from the year and just make each person a separate skate park so we’ll have a full length skate video probably by then

     

    If it’s not too boring

     

    AJC:

    Well let’s hope somebody in the future when they’re being interviewed in a similar style to this expresses that video about to be made with you guys in it as their favourite video. It could happen. Thank you very much both of you

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    It’s alright.

     

    AJC:

    And, yeah, enjoy your skating and I’ll catch up with you soon.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Thank you. Will do.

     

    AJC:

    Cheers guys.

     

    WILLIAM AND GEORGE:

    Cheers.

     

    See you.

     

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

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  • Interviews and Storytelling: Liam Gaunt

    [TRACK 1]

     

    AJ CREEDY:

    We’ve got Liam Gaunt with us, who is a local Hebden Bridge skateboarder. Hello.

     

    LAIM GAUNT:

    Hello.

     

    AJC:

    Why do you like skateboarding then?

     

    LG:

    Cos it’s summat to do that doesn’t involve going about causing trouble and stuff, and what teenagers get a bad report for aren’t they like, and people think we’re all about taking drugs and drinking but there’s a positive side to it – teenagers in Hebden I think. It’s just good fun as well, and it’s self-achievement…yeah, that’s about it I think.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous, that’s brilliant. And what kind of skating do you like?

     

    LG:

    All of it really. I like to be as all-rounded as possible. I’m not too good on the rail, but everything else I think I’m half decent on, so it’s quite good.

     

    AJC:

    That’s brilliant. So what skills do you think you need to be a good skater?

     

    LG:

    ….just

     

    AJC:

    Or to be a skater in general actually.

     

    LG:

    I think being good with other people, like if you can get on with people, that helps a lot, and not giving up like wanting to try new stuff, and just generally enjoying it and if you enjoy it then that’s it.

     

    AJC:

    With a bit of determination and social skills as well.

     

    LG:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, fantastic. What skate parks have you been to?

     

    LG:

    We went to all the ones in Scotland, like Kirkintilloch and Unit 23 and that, and then there’s like Hyde Park and The Works in Leeds, and Wakefield’s got a really good park, and where else……..Clitheroe’s got a nice park there; it’s pretty weird but I really enjoyed that. There’s Ramp City in Blackpool, and…..yeah I think that’s it really.

     

    AJC:

    So out of those then, which one would you say was the best and why would that be?

     

    LG:

    I like Hyde Park, just cos everyone one up there is really nice and get along with you and that, and I like the mini ramps and that there, it’s fun…and you don’t have to pay to go there either

     

    AJC:

    It’s free?

     

    LG:

    Yeah, cos it’s outside. All the other parks that are generally really good, you have to pay to go in to, and it’s pretty bad.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough. Free is always good isn’t it?

     

    LG:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, one of my favourite words. How do you like Hebden Bridge skate park?

     

    LG:

    It’s really good for like learning stuff on cos like the hip and that’s quite small, but it gets packed as well, and it’s all, the bikes and stuff that run you over; they don’t like us and generally we don’t really like them, and there’s a bit of confrontation between us I’d say, and they get in your way as well and they don’t really care, cos they’re on the bigger thing at the end of the day; they’ve a bigger mode of transport or whatever. No, they just run in to you and it really hurts.

     

    AJC:

    I bet it does. So, what would you say was good about it?

     

    LG:

    The half pipes really I enjoy and the blocks are alright for learning stuff on, and then everything else sort of flows really as well; you can go from one part to the other part without having to like stop and get off your skateboard; you can keep your speed up and stuff, and that’s really good as well.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous. Do you think – here’s a weird one – do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    LG:

    Suppose it could be couldn’t it? I dunno.

     

    AJC:

    It could.

     

    LG:

    ….I dunno….yeah, I think it should really because it would show like, because people generally think that we just go about breaking stuff, it would show that it’s how good it is and how hard it is really. People don’t tend to appreciate that it does take a lot of effort to do even the simplest of stuff on a skateboard.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely. Would you say there is a good skateboarding crowd?

     

    LG:

    In Hebden or just generally?

     

    AJC:

    Generally.

     

    LG:

    Yeah. Most people that skate you can get on with because you’ve got something in common instantly. There is a few slightly obnoxious people and….yeah in general you stay away from them sort of people, like when we go to Leeds we meet new people; we skate – every day when we go to Leeds we end up skating with new people and meeting new people and that, and it’s just a good way. Everyone’s sound really.

     

    AJC:

    So it’s a good social life.

     

    LG:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, that sounds good. Would you say there was any rules and conventions?

     

    LG:

    Taking your turn’s quite a big one….if someone’s trying a trick and you know you can do it alright, it’s fair enough like trying a trick with them but when you can do a trick and you like do it then after they’ve tried it, it’s generally a better line, so you just generally use your common sense. Not get in people’s way, don’t do tricks if you’re trying to show off, unless it’s a joke; if it’s a joke it’s fairly fine really, but yeah, you’ve just got to be alright with people really.

     

    AJC:

    Sounds fair enough. What famous skateboarders or teams do you like?

     

    LG:

    I like mainly English skaters, like no-one’s made, well not many people have made ridiculous amounts of money. People in England just seem content with skateboarding; Ben Nordburg….Mike – Mike Wright, it’s good having him about…..all the guys at Hyde are really….well it sounds weird, but they’re quite influential because they’ve all got their different styles and that, and I think just generally people about that you see that are better, it gives you a nice…..I don’t even know the word, I’m just talking a load of rubbish

     

    AJC:

    Not at all

     

    LG:

    Like people, like the more local people from Leeds and Manchester and that, because we go Manchester and Leeds quite a lot we end up talking to them and because they’ve got sponsors like Mike and Joe and that, it’s….I don’t even know, it’s just sound which is quite good been able to talk to people who’ve got decent amounts of experience and that, it’s really good.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous. So, what other things do you do besides skating?

     

    LG:

    …….nothing much really to be fair. If I’m not skating and it’s raining I generally stay at home and I’m either on my computer…I make music, I play guitar and I like to produce music on Reason and that, but if I’m not on my computer doing music or playing my guitar, I’m generally either skating or sleeping, or at school.

     

    AJC:

    I think making music and playing your guitar is not nothing.

     

    LG:…..I don’t know. I don’t do it to try and achieve much, I just do it to chill out and learn new stuff cos, yeah again, you get achievement off stuff like that.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely. So you don’t have a job?

     

    LG:

    No.

     

    AJC:

    That’s okay. How often do you skate, and when you do, for how long?

     

    LG:

    After school if it’s dry and I can be bothered, pretty much every day after school from like fourish till maybe seven or eight, depending on whether it’s winter or summer and that, and then at the weekends from like…it depends what time I wake up, but like sometimes it’s like ten till like nine, and then like the same the next day, whatever time I get up at generally till I get home when I cannot be bothered skating any more, and then I stop…..and then I stop.

     

    AJC:

    What about music? What kind of music do you like, or skate videos – is there a specific skate video that you like?

     

    LG:

    I enjoy watching the Shake and Baker videos and that, I find them quite funny really, and a lot of the English ones, like ‘The Big Push’ – that happens every year, that’s a very good video….there’s quite a lot of good old stuff, like I remember there was like the 2004 ‘Wild In The Streets’ thing I found in my room, I watched that the other day, that’s really good cos there’s like up and coming skaters that are now like fairly well done in the scene and that. Yeah, just anything generally.

     

    AJC:

    Do you have any footage on the internet of yourself?

     

    LG:

    I think there’s like one trick of me doing a really crappy nose slide chill out, oh I think I’m on that Scotland video but I think I’m just talking on that….no, I generally don’t like people filming me for stuff like that….unless I can do like something that I think myself is really decent; I just generally don’t get filmed, I don’t like it really. It puts you under pressure a bit.

     

    AJC:

    I suppose it does. There’s no specific link then to any footage?

     

    LG:

    No.

     

    AJC:

    Well that’s brilliant. Thank you very much, and enjoy your skating.

     

    LG:

    Yeah, you two. Have fun doing that.

     

    AJC:

    Cheers. See you later.

     

    LG:

    See you later.

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

     

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  • Interviews and Storytelling: Jack Knowles

    [TRACK 1]

     

    A J CREEDY:

    Okay, we’ve got Jack here who’s a local Hebden Bridge skateboarder; hello.

     

    JACK:

    Hello.

     

    AJC:

    Why do like skateboarding then Jack?

     

    JACK:

    Cos it gives me summat to do, in like, my time.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough.

     

    JACK:

    It’s fun as well.

     

    AJC:

    Good. So, what kind of skating do you like best?

     

    JACK:

    Any skating…you can skate just about anywhere. Skate park skating’s the best though.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, so, rather than the street.

     

    JACK:

    Yeah, like skating on the ramps and stuff.

     

    AJC:

    Cool, that’s good. What skills do you need to be a good skater, would you say?

     

    JACK:

    You need confidence, and you need co-ordination, and you need a high jump.

     

    AJC:

    A high jump?

     

    JACK:

    A high jump to like jump….you also need to be also to commit, to like to do tricks, like, to follow it through and not back down.

     

    AJC:

    So, what skate parks have you been to?

     

    JACK:

    I’ve been to Hyde, I’ve been to the Works, I’ve been to Interact, I’ve been to Wakefield. I went on ones with the Council, the Hebden Bridge Council, round to different skate parks, and obviously I’ve been to Hebden Bridge Skate Park, and….yeah…

     

    AJC:

    So which one sounds the best in your opinion?

     

    JACK:

    The Works.

     

    AJC:

    Why is that?

     

    JACK:

    Cos it’s huge, and everything’s there’s skateable, and then I’d say Hyde cos it’sl ike Hebden but it’s bigger and it’s better.

     

    AJC:

    So what would you say is good about Hebden, in fact what do you thing about Hebden skate park really?

     

    JACK:

    It’s too small.

     

    AJC:

    It’s too small.

     

    JACK:

    But it’s….it’s got a few good skaters on it though.

     

    AJC:

    So good points?

     

    JACK:

    ……I don’t know….it’s got some good ramps and built well. There’s still quite a few things that you can do on it.

     

    AJC:

    Do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    JACK:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Why?

     

    JACK:

    Because skateboarding is better than a sport, it’s like a lifestyle.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely. I’d go for that. Is there a good skateboarding crowd in your opinion?

     

    JACK:

    Yeah, because there’s like the chavvy crowd; they all just get pissed and piss about on the streets, and then there’s the skaters; they just go skating and so something with their time.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely. Are there any rules and conventions in skateboarding?

     

    JACK:

    Yeah…..they don’t like BMX’s.

     

    AJC:

    Why’s that?

     

    JACK:

    Because they get in the way.

     

    AJC:

    But is it a rule or convention would you say, or would you prefer it to be a rule?

     

    JACK:

    I would say the best rule in skateboarding is to land on the board.

     

    AJC:

    Is that a rule?

     

    JACK:

    Well, yeah it’s a rule but it’s not a very well kept rule.

     

    AJC:

    It’s not a very well kept rule. I was thinking when you see sort of, when you go to a skate park and there’s loads and loads of people there, but yet nobody seems to get in the way, maybe apart from the odd BMXer. Is that a sort of a hidden

     

    JACK:

    That’s because like, your skateboard after a while becomes a part of your body. You can control it, like if you walk through a city with loads of people, you’re just skating round loads of skaters.

     

    AJC:

    So it’s control then really?

     

    JACK:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Wow. It looks very impressive. What famous skateboarders or skateboarding teams do you like and why?

     

    JACK:

    The Almost team cos Mike’s on it and he’s from Hebden, and like Globe Team cos they’ve got some amazing videos on the internet.

     

    AJC:

    Cool. Sounds good. What other things do you do when you’re not skateboarding?

     

    JACK:

    …..nothing really, just go piss about somewhere, go play on the X-box or summat, that’s about it.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough. So you don’t have a job?

     

    JACK:

    No I don’t have a job.

     

    AJC:

    That’s okay. How often do you skate and when you do, how long does it last?

     

    JACK:

    Well if it’s not raining and there’s somewhere to skate, then I’ll be skating, so it’s pretty much every day.

     

    AJC:

    So how long’s a session? All day?

     

    JACK.

    Well yeah, about eight hours a day, just when I can fit it in. As long as I’m not doing summat then I’m skating.

     

    AJC:

    Cool. So what about music then? Is there any particular music that you like? Skate content or skate videos even?

     

    JACK:

    Hip hop and dubstep and drum and bass, and then skate videos like….obviously Globe United By Fate.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant. So do you have any footage on the internet of yourself?

     

     

    JACK:

    No, but at school I’m doing the Media Diploma. I’m getting a GCSE out of making a skating film, and I’ve pretty much got six minutes of footage, well I’ve got like three hours of footage but I’ve got a six minute video already.

     

    AJC:

    So there’s nothing out there yet as such?

     

    JACK:

    No, it’s not on the internet yet.

     

    AJC:

    But you’ll be putting it out on the internet

     

    JACK:

    I’ll be putting it on the internet when it’s finished. I’ve got until November to finish it.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous. That would be an ideal Christmas present for somebody then.

     

    JACK:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Well I look forward to seeing it mate, and all the best. Thank you.

     

    JACK:

    Right, cheers.

     

    AJC:

    Cheers.

     

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

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  • Interviews and Storytelling: Tom Young

    [TRACK 1]

     

    AJ CREEDY:

    We’ve got Thomas Young here who’s a local Hebden Bridge skateboarder. So, hello.

     

    THOMAS YOUNG:

    Hi there.

     

    AJC:

    What do you like about skateboarding?

     

    TY:

    It’s a good time-passer, it’s fun, summat to do…..yeah, it’s fun.

     

    AJC:

    That’s fair enough; fun’s good enough. So, what kind of skating do you like best, because I realise there’s more than one form?

     

    TY:

    Big ramps, grinds, not too into street or anything like that; parks.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough. What skills do you think you need to be a good skater?

     

    TY:

    Good balance…..you need to be able to commit to a trick, so like be able to land, know how to bail.

     

    AJC:

    Know how to bail.

     

    TY:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah. I think that’s a pretty wise plan if things are really difficult. What skate parks have you been to?

     

    TY:

    I’ve been to a few local parks and like in the nearest cities, Leeds and Manchester, and I’ve been to a lot of skate parks in Scotland, mainly wet ones, so, yeah

     

    AJC:

    Think I remember those. [laughter]. Which one did you like best?

     

    TY:

    ….I liked Unit 23 in Scotland. There’s loads of big ramps and it was a big indoor park.

     

    AJC:

    How do you like Hebden Bridge skate park?

     

    TY:

    I think we’re really lucky to have it in Hebden cos of the size of the town and that, bit it could always do with being a bit bigger.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely. What would you say was good about it though?

     

    TY:

    Decent size half pipe, a good like streety section, it’s quite a variety of different stuff with different people.

    AJC:

    Fair enough. Do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    TY:

    Yeah I think that would be a really good idea. I think a lot more middle-aged people would enjoy it more and not associate it with like drugs and drink.

     

    AJC:

    That’s interesting. So would you say there is a good skateboarding crowd?

     

    TY:

    I think there’s a good skateboarding crowd for like the youth, but there’s not many middle-aged people enjoy it.

     

    AJC:

    And are there any rules and conventions in skateboarding….that you are aware of?

     

    TY:

    There’s like manners, so you like take it in turns and let other people go and stuff like that; don’t be greedy with it, and like don’t…..if you have a run on the park, like you don’t like take ages with it.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough, yeah that’s definitely otherwise it would be chaos wouldn’t it? What famous skateboarders or teams do you like?

     

    TY:

    There’s a few I like. Rodney Mullen cos…..he’s got like really good balance and he does loads of unique stuff, and….Tony Hawk

     

    AJC:

    Tony Hawk

     

    TY:

    First to do a 900, but he’s not that good any more….that’s about it really. Rodney Mullen’s my favourite I think.

     

    AJC:

    Okay, that’s fair enough. What other things do you do besides skateboarding?

     

    TY:

    Mountain biking; I like that as well. Usually go out on weekends mountain biking….exams at the minute….apart from that, not really much.

     

    AJC:

    Testing times. So do you have a job? I’m sure you don’t have time for one do you?

     

    TY:

    No I haven’t got a job at the minute, no.

     

    AJC:

    That’s fair enough. How often do you like to skate?

     

    TY:

    Depending on the weather really, like…..depends…..a good three, four times a week.

     

    AJC:

    And how long is your average stint?

     

    TY:

    Three, four hours usually.

     

    AJC:

    Three or four hours.

     

    TY:

    Depends though really.

     

    AJC:

    What music do you like, or skate videos?

     

    TY:

    I like drum and bass, stuff like that, stuff that’s lively to listen to when you’re skating, that’s what’s good on videos….I like other stuff as well, but it depends….I dunno

     

    AJC:

    Depends what you’re doing.

     

    TY:

    Yeah it depends on your mood.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, fair enough. What about skate videos?

     

    TY:

    A lot of stuff that’s lively, so yeah, skate videos…I dunno really.

     

    AJC:

    That’s fair enough, that’s okay. Do you have any footage on the internet?.....he says knowingly

     

    TY:

    ….I’ve got…do you remember when we went to Scotland?….I’ve made a video about that….loads of interviews and skating and stuff like that, it’s good.

     

    AJC:

    So, is there a link?

     

    TY:

    I know it’s on Facebook and You Tube.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant, so we’ll see it on there. Thanks Tom.

     

    TY:

    Okay.

     

    AJC:

    See you later.

     

    TY:

    See you.

     

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

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  • Interviews and Storytelling: Jacob Jones

    [TRACK 1]


    AJ CREEDY:

    Okay, we’re joined by Jacob, a local Hebden Bridge skateboarder. Hello.


    JACOB JONES:

    Hello.


    AJC:

    So, why do you like skateboarding?


    JJ:

    I think it’s just really good to get out with your mates, out in the fresh air, just chilling with your…..like, just being out instead of being stuck at home in front of the TV.


    AJC:

    Yeah absolutely. And what kind of skating do you like best then?


    JJ:

    Well we sometimes go round Hebden looking for spots, just like walls to jump off and stair sets, and then we occasionally go to Leeds or something to go to Hyde Park and if it’s raining to The Works which is an indoor park.


    AJC:

    So is it more street skating that you tend to veer towards?


    JJ:

    A bit of both really.


    AJC:

    Bit of variety then, yeah.


    JJ:

    Fifty-fifty.


    AJC:

    So, what skills do you think you need to be a good skater?


    JJ:

    Balance, able to socialise I think is quite important and…..just ready to have fun.


    AJC:

    Yeah, absolutely. Sounds good to me. So, what skate parks have you been to?


    JJ:

    I’ve been to Hebden of course, a lot, which I go to after school most of the time. I’ve been to Hyde Park in Leeds, been to quite a few up to Scotland where we went for a trip…..the one in Leeds again, the indoor one, I think that’s about it….oh, there’s Ripponden as well which I’ve been to a couple of times which is good fun.


    AJC:

    I didn’t even realise there was a skate park in Ripponden.


    JJ:

    No, well there is.


    AJC:

    This is a learning curve all the time. So out of all these skateboard parks, which do you like the best?


    JJ:

    Well, I’ve been to Hebden quite a lot so I think I’m getting a bit bored of that, but I think Hyde Park in Leeds cos it’s a lot bigger and a lot more people go in there, so I think I prefer that one.


    AJC:

    Fair enough. What do you think of Hebden Bridge skate park?


    JJ:

    I think it’s a really good place just to chill out with your friends but I definitely think it needs expanding.


    AJC:

    It needs expanding.


    JJ:

    Definitely.


    AJC:

    Give me one good thing about it.


    JJ:

    It’s really close to where I live, so I can just…..five minute walk away.


    AJC:

    That’s got to be one of the best things hasn’t it, not far to go?


    JJ:

    Definitely.


    AJC:

    So do you think skateboarding should be an Olympis sport?


    JJ:

    I dunno….well, there’s a lot of competitions at the moment for it, so if it got in to the Olympics that would be really good, I think it would be good to watch, a good sport.


    AJC:

    I agree, I agree. Is there a good skateboarding crowd?


    JJ:

    Yeah definitely, the guys down here are really good fun to chill out with, it’s good.


    AJC:

    Excellent. And would you say there are any rules or conventions in skateboarding?


    JJ:

    Well, there are some people that are out to get you, with what you’re wearing and stuff but I don’t really listen to that, I just do whatever I want really….yeah.


    AJC:

    And long may you do so as well. You look pretty cool to me mate, anyway, so….have you got any famous skateboarders that you particularly like?


    JJ:

    Well of course there’s Mike over there


    AJC:

    Oh really?


    JJ:

    He lives in Hebden and he’s sponsored by quite a few people, so….yeah, he’s a good guy as well to chill out with.


    AJC:

    Fair enough. What other things do you do besides skating?


    JJ:

    Well I’m in a brass band in Hebden, and….I stilt for a parade every year, and….that’s it really; a boring person, but


    AJC:

    That’s not boring at all actually. What do you play in the band?


    JJ:

    Trombone.


    AJC:

    Trombone.


    JJ:

    Yeah.


    AJC:

    Fantastic. And is that fun?


    JJ:

    Yeah it’s…..it’s good, but there are some weirdoes in the band at the moment.


    AJC:

    Oh dear.


    JJ:

    Yeah, but it will be alright I’m sure.


    AJC:

    I’m sure it will, I’m sure it will. Do you have a job at the moment?


    JJ:

    No I don’t, but I think I really need one.


    AJC:

    There’s a few looking for them, I’ve found out through these interviews [laughing]. I’ll see what I can do. How often do you skate and when you do, how long is a session?


    JJ:

    I usually come down after school from half three till about half five, quarter to six so that’s like an hour and a half or something, two hours, and then I go home, have my tea usually, and maybe come out just in to a car park which is opposite my house and just roll about there and just chill with a mate.


    AJC:

    Is that the market square?


    JJ:

    No it’s….you know where the old library used to be?


    AJC:

    Yeah I do.


    JJ:

    Well we go there quite a bit and there’s some little kerbs to grind and just a little bridge to flatland.


    AJC:

    Fabulous, sounds good. What music do you like and are there any skate videos that you could particularly recommend for me?


    JJ:

    Well…I’m not sure what my favourite music is, but I think when editing a video it’s really important to choose a good track, so one that’s got a good beat to it and one that isn’t too….bad, if you know what I mean.


    AJC:

    What kind of style would it be do you reckon?


    JJ:

    Usually like…..I dunno….there’s quite a lot, but usually like hip hop or….summat like that….pop or rock


    AJC:

    Drum and bass maybe?


    JJ:

    No, not drum and bass.


    AJC:

    Not drum and bass, no?


    JJ:

    No that’s a bit fast, and it can be quite slow.


    AJC:

    Okay, that’s interesting. And have you seen any skate videos that you particularly like?


    JJ:

    There’s one that I like at the moment, and it’s just really good. The music’s great, the skating’s really good, a lot of really good tricks and I just enjoy watching it over and over again.


    AJC:

    Brilliant. And what’s it called?


    JJ:

    I can’t actually remember off the top of my head at the moment.


    AJC:

    But it’s good?


    JJ:

    Yeah.


    AJC:

    That’s all that counts. So you can give me a recommendation and I can go back and You Tube it. Do you have any footage of you skating on the internet?


    JJ:

    I created a film with…..I filmed it, but I’m not in it, but there’s a lot from Hebden – all of it’s from Hebden – and it’s just all people from here doing it….yeah.


    AJC:

    Is there a link for that?


    JJ:

    I think…..if you go on to You Tube and go on to ‘doctorinterneteyes’ which is Mike’s You Tube account, and it’s called ‘Jake’s Skateboard Film’ or something like that


    AJC:

    Oh right


    JJ:

    So you’ll just find it on there.


    AJC:

    I’ll check it out. Right, that’s it. It was fairly painless wasn’t it really?


    JJ:

    Yeah, thank you very much.


    AJC:

    No, thank you


    [END OF TRACK 1]


    Read more

  • Interviews and Storytelling: James Burke

    [TRACK 1]

     

    AJ CREEDY:

    We’ve got James Burke, local Hebden Bridge skateboarder. It is Hebden Bridge isn’t it? Anyway, hello.

     

    JAMES BURKE:

    Hello.

     

    AJC:

    How are you doing?

     

    JB:

    Not too bad, yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Jolly good. So, what is it you like about skateboarding?

     

    JB:

    Well it’s just exercise really; it’s something to do when I’m not working and that, but now I’m working a bit I don’t really have the opportunity to go as frequently as I’d like to, but still I get to meet a lot of people so it’s summat to do, like actively seeking to extend the skate park as well. That gives everybody ideas and gets everyone together so it’s like….everybody comes from the community as a group, you know what I mean, so it’s quite nice.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant. That’s really good. So, what kind of skating do you actually like best?

     

    JB:

    …..mainly street skating and that, but since they built the skate park and that in Hebden it’s all sort of congregated there, so we don’t really skate anywhere else and that, but, yeah, the skate park’s really good for it now, you know what I mean, they’ve built something for us so it definitely gets used a lot more.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant. So,what skills do you think you need to be a good skater?

     

    JB:

    ……just determination really more than anything. The skill comes after a bit, it’s just patience really because it’s taken me ages to do stuff, but like you see all t’little kids that are just doing these amazing tricks and it’s just, well, furious anger, but no, it’s just determination really. if you’re patient then it will come to you, so…just bid your time and you’ll learn

     

    AJC:

    So just patience and determination really. I’d go with that. Which skate parks have you actually visited then?

     

    JB:

    Well, not really that many cos I used to just mainly cruise around spots on the streets and like different towns and that, but been to one in Brighouse and that….that’s alright, but when I went round all t’other skate parks like back in t’day I couldn’t really do anything so it weren’t really that much of a great experience, you just stood in t’corner and all bikes and stuff and that, but now…just a handful and that, not that many.

     

    AJC:

    So which one do you like the best then, do you think?

     

    JB:

    Probably Hebden cos I can walk there in like two or three minutes, so it’s alright. If I get a day off and like everyone’s at school, there’s no-one there so I’ve got it to myself.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous. How do you like Hebden Bridge skate park then?

     

    JB:

    It’s good for what’s there, but now we’ve had it a while and more people collectively skate on it like, and say at weekends, everyone’s off school, everyone’s off work you know what I mean, so everybody’s crammed in to this small spot, so like, when you get the opportunity to skate, you’re stood around like, because there’s too many people there. Apart from that it’s a really good like little spot, what we’ve got you know what I mean, so

     

    AJC:

    I mean that’s a disadvantage isn’t it, that it gets very crowded, but what would you say, if you could pick one good thing about it, what would you say that was?......A real advantage?

     

    JB:

    I’d just have to mention the fun box really. I just love that little pyramid we’ve got; like, that’s my favourite but it’s like the only thing I really skate.

     

    AJC:

    You’re not the first to have mentioned that.

     

    JB:

    I’m not? A lot of all t’kids and that, they all like skate the vert ramp and like the half pipe and stuff like that; I stay away from that mainly like; I’m usually a flat ground skater and just cruise about doing manuals and stuff, but yeah, that like fun box is definitely something I’m fond of and use quite a lot, but when everyone’s down you’ve got a big line of people on top of it and you just can’t get past or whatever, you’ve got to wait your turn and that, so that goes back to the patience and that, so you’ve got to be a bit calm about it you know I mean, and wait your turn, but everyone down there is rather nice about it, you know what I mean, so, just naturally everybody sort of waits their turn, you know what I mean, some order sort of naturally forms, you know what I mean, one after t’other and that, and everyone gets a go on that, so

     

    AJC:

    So that’s one….is there any rules and conventions do you in skateboarding, cos that’s almost an unwritten thing isn’t it?

     

    JB:

    I would imagine it’s different wherever you go, I mean like, obviously like if I went to another skate park that I’d not been to, the locals might be a bit like ‘oh we’re more important’ - skating in front and that, but like sublimely that sort of has an effect in Hebden slightly, but then it’s sort of not at all, cos once you get skating and chatting to everyone it’s sound you know, I mean it’s just another person from Hebden you know what I mean, so it’s sort of good

     

    AJC:

    Yeah…..would you say that…here’s a strange question – do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    JB:

    …….yeah, I’d like it to be. I don’t reckon the British Government with their Health and Safety Policies would agree, but definitely it should cos there’s a lot of skill involved, you know, I mean, definitely professional skatboarders and that; you just look at Mike Wright, you know what I mean, some of t’stuff he does is just like mind-boggling you know I mean, and it’s like, he definitely should be applauded you know I mean, a pat on t’back for that.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely.

     

    JB:

    So I don’t know – yeah, if you can do it, like if people are that skilled they should round up people and just get them together you know I mean?

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, I’d go with that. Is there a good skateboarding crowd generally then?

     

    JB:

    Round Hebden Bridge, yeah, definitely like, but as I said with work and that I can’t get about all t’time, but whenever I come down it’s like, you get people from like Sowerby Bridge and Halifax and Huddersfield and they all come down; everyone recognises each other after a couple of trips down and that, so it’s just like chilling with people from t’Bridge and that, so….it’s good.

     

    AJC:

    So, what famous skateboarders or teams do you like, and why?

     

    JB:

    …..well…..it’s been a while since I’ve really watched any like videos and that, but…..like any skaters and you know what I mean, little edits and that, I usually just see what people find on You Tube and that, but I don’t know…..I think there was a guy called….from Brazil…..he’s called Fabrizio Santos or summat, it’s going like a couple of years back; he’s absolutely incredible.

     

    AJC:

    So, what other things do you do besides skating?

     

    JB:

    Well I work a lot, working on tumble driers and that – they’re well fun, but I’m in a group, a hip hop collective called ‘Recorded Filth’ and that, we’ve been doing a lot of gigs recently and that, but it’s sort of slowed down a bit so we’re gonna work on some new material and that, but apart from skating, working….yeah just earning money and that, performing and stuff you know I mean, yeah it’s quite fun

     

    AJC:

    That’s great. Skating and ‘Recorded Filth’ and working

     

    JB:

    ‘Recorded Filth’ yeah

     

    AJC:

    So, what’s the job then?

    JB:

    It’s…..I build tumble driers basically. Don’t be confused with washing machines – it’s tumble driers [laughing] I tell all my mates and they like ‘oh are you still at the washing machine factory?’… ‘it’s tumble driers!’ [laughter]

     

    AJC:

    A common question then. So, how often do you skate and how long?

     

    JB:

    Well I used to skate practically every day before I got my job, that’s before I got my job and that, but since I’ve got my job I can’t really afford to injure myself until I’m a permanent worker, so I’ve had to ease off a bit skating – I bray my knees all t’time, I’m a bit silly like, falling over and stuff, but like it’s usually like I get a good day’s skating like every two week or summat. If I time it right, like a lot of other people go to other skate parks so it’s a lot quieter, so I can get more done you know what I mean, like I can just work out tricks and that, but recently like, I’ve been coming out of t’pub and that and seeing people with skateboards and that – they’ve had a day skating round t’streets and that and I can still do stuff and it’s like

     

    AJC:

    What even after the pub?

     

    JB:

    Yeah, I can do it better after the pub than I do like….cos with t’heat and stuff I come down, I’m not used to t’heat, you know what I mean

     

    AJC:

    Even with the tumble driers?

     

    JB:

    It’s bad in a factory and that, but you come down to skate and I end up laying on t’grass most of t’time just like…..and you feel fine, you get on t’skateboard and it’s…..dripping with sweat, you know what I mean, so if it’s got a nice breeze you know what I mean with it then it’s alright and I can do stuff, but you don’t have the energy half the time when it’s weather like this, so

     

    AJC:

    I know what you’re saying, yeah, it’s been getting to me today has the weather actually. So, what about music then? You say you play with ‘Recorded Filth’ or you perform with ‘Recorded Filth’ – but what kind of music do you like and are there any skate videos that you are actually into?

     

    JB:

    Well, skate videos-wise…that ‘expand the Hebden Bridge skate park’ video, I mean check it out….I’m chatting loads of nonsense and that, but it’s just like…..little edit with like….unsigned skateboarders and stuff like, cos….sort of the same aspects like I think with music and that, like I’m not into what’s in the charts and stuff, like I find the little gems – you’ve got to look for them rather than it just being provided on t’radio or this is what you should be watching at the minute like, so if you look for it you’ll find that stuff and you find a lot of talented people, like just searching, do you know what I mean? Skateboarding – You Tube’s great for it you know what I mean, like you’ll find all sorts on there and that, but off t’top of my head I couldn’t really like name any, but I’ve got a big folder saved off You Tube and that of like videos like, but like I say with working and stuff you don’t get the chance to watch them and that, but

     

    AJC:

    What about music? What kind of music do you like?

     

    JB:

    Music-wise I’m into a lot of hip hop and that like with being in ‘Recorded Filth’ so I’ve just grown up with it, you know what I mean, although drum and bass, I’m a fond fan of drum and bass. At work with my play list I’ve got a big hip hop one and then I switch over to drum and bass and do a bit of work, and then slow down and play some hip hop and that, so….I like anything really, providing the effort’s gone in to it then I sort of like listen to it, but I don’t know….if it’s stuff on t’radio, I can’t stand it, it’s like people get paid so much for just untalentness nonsense you know what I mean, it drives me mad really you know what I mean, you’ve got….but I know a lot of local bands are a lot more talented and a lot more effort goes in to what they’re making and producing than like stuff you hear on Top of t’Pops and that, you know what I mean, it’s like I’ve stopped watching telly; I just can’t stand adverts and anything like that you know what I mean

     

    AJC:

    I think you do right actually, yeah

     

    JB:

    I just don’t like being force fed stuff you know what I mean like, I’d rather find it myself and do it myself, so

     

    AJC:

    That sounds great. So this piece of footage you’ve got on the internet then; is there a link to that?

     

    JB:

    It’s on You Tube. I think….I can’t fully remember what it’s called but it’s summat along the lines of ‘Help Expand Our Skate Park’ or summat. If you search in Hebden Bridge like after a bit, clicking through t’videos you’re bound to find it and that; it’s just a little interview of a few people. Kim Blackburn’s on it and like Mike Wright and Tony Allen are skating and stuff like that, and an old…..like a youth worker, James, do you remember James?

     

    AJC:

    I do remember James, yeah

     

    JB:

    He’s on it and Kim

     

    AJC:

    In fact I know all of the above

     

    JB:

    Yeah yeah, I think you might have been on it as well, you might have seen it back in t’day

     

    AJC:

    I think I probably did actually, a bit of it anyway.

     

    JB:

    So yeah, it’s just there, all of us lot trying to get together and we just arranged a day out, like bring everybody down - bikers, skateboarders, roller bladers, whatever, whoever wants to come, just show this is that many people who’ve used this and we sort of really need it a little bit bigger, and just to sort of express why we want an extension and all that you know what I mean, so….I don’t know – it was just good to get different points of view from people and that you know what I mean, and so…yeah I enjoyed it, but You Tube it.

     

    AJC:

    Thank you very much.

     

    JB:

    Alright, yeah, it’s a pleasure, I’m glad to have helped.

     

    AJC:

    And don’t work too hard, don’t get too hot and enjoy your skating when you get round to it.

     

    JB:

    I will yeah, it’s been fun

     

    AJC:

    I’ll catch your gig sometime. Cheers mate.

     

    JB:

    Alright, no worries.

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

    Read more

  • Interviews and Storytelling: Will Boylan

    [TRACK 1]

     

    AJ CREEDY:

    So, we’ve got William Edward Boylan who’s a local Hebden Bridge skateboarder, probably among other things but that’s what we’re interested in tonight.

     

    WILLIAM EDWARD BOYLAN:

    Hiya.

     

    AJC:

    Why do you like skateboarding then?

     

    WEB:

    Something to do, like if you can go at the weekend or after school, you can just chill with your mates and yeah, it’s quite enjoyable, so it’s a good thing to do if you like it, then you can stick at it and get better.

     

    AJC:

    What kind of skating do you like best?

     

    WEB:

    ….just on the skate park really and like sometimes we go over to Leeds and go on the bigger skate parks, but Hebden’s just a normal skate park so it’s aright, just, yeah, and there’s loads of your mates down there so you can just chill

     

    AJC:

    So there’s not a specific kind of skating that you like then? Like street or

     

    WEB:

    Yeah, a bit of both really, cos I’m not really good cos I’ve just started, but I’ll get used to it

     

    AJC:

    Give it all a go.

     

    WEB:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    What skills would you say you need to be a good skater?

     

    AJC:

    ….just…..I dunno….just any…

     

    AJC:

    Well I’ve tried it before and I found balance to be the problem.

     

    WEB:

    Yeah, most people have problems with it but when you get better you get used to it and you just get better and better.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, fair enough, fair enough. What skate parks have you been to?

     

    WEB:

    I’ve been to Hyde in Leeds a few times, I’ve been to street skating and I’ve been to Manchester; I’ve been to quite a few places and I’ve been to Manchester a few times, yeah I’ve been around quite a bit.

     

    AJC:

    So you’ve been to a few. Which one would you say was the best?

     

    WEB:

    Probably Hyde because you know like people are nice up there, there’s a big skate park with loads of little like ramps and stuff so yeah, it’s good.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough. How do you like the Hebden Bridge skate park?

     

    WEB:

    Yeah it’s good. It’s alright, yeah. It’s got pretty much

     

    AJC:

    What’s good about it?

     

    WEB:

    Well it’s got all the things you pretty much need but it needs to be extended a bit because sometimes it just gets a bit over-packed and then you can’t really skate, so but yeah it’s good, I like it.

     

    AJC:

    You’ve not the only one to say that.

     

    WEB:

    Yeah

     

    AJC:

    So here’s an interesting one. Do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    WEB:

    ….no….no not really cos….no, I don’t think so because people argue about football and all that, so….no.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely. Keep it to yourself; I can’t blame you. Is there a good skateboarding crowd?

     

    WEB:

    Yeah, it you’re good then people start to like look at you and then you just…..and then people…you get to know people and then you just meet up with them and they bring their friends, but yeah, it’s good.

     

    AJC:

    Good fun, yeah?

     

    WEB:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Are there any rules or conventions in skateboarding?

     

    WEB:

    ….well not that I know of

     

    AJC:

    Well I’m just thinking when sort of like you go down to the skateboard park and sometimes there’s absolutely loads of people down there and they don’t bump in to each other, so how does that work?

     

    WEB:

    You just like line up….no you don’t line up, you just like you have a turn then someone else has a turn and then like you go first again so it’s like a big circle or

     

    AJC:

    Respect.

     

    WEB:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Which is a sort of convention really isn’t it I suppose. I’ve just noticed that otherwise it would be absolute chaos [laughing]. What famous skateboarders or teams do you like?

     

    WEB:

    ‘Ten Deep’ – they’re funny guys but I like those….yeah there’s some good people out there what I like, but yeah they’re all funny and they’re all nice, they’re not like really greedy or like full of themselves, they’re really nice.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough. What other things do you do when you’re not skateboarding?

     

    AJC:

    Well it depends cos usually, cos I play footie as well and I do a bit of biking, so I’m a bit like all over, but if it’s raining then I’ll just stay in or sometimes I’ll play footie with my mates, and on the weekends I’ll just be riding with my dad sometimes, or just footie and skating if I have enough time. After school I’ll come down and skate for a bit and then just go home.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant. So do you have a job?

     

    WEB:

    No I don’t [laughing]

     

    AJC:

    That’s alright. It’s alright – I’m not from the Social or anything [laughing]. How often do you skate and when you skate, how long do you skate for?

     

    WEB:

    On the weekends if it’s nice then I’ll come down for like a full day pretty much and then just…yeah, but after school I’ll come down for about three hours or two and then just go home and just do my thing, but, yeah, if it’s a nice day at the weekend I might be down there for a full day.

     

    AJC:

    And what about music? Is there any particular music that you like or skate videos that goes with skating?

     

    WEB:

    Yeah there’s quite a lot of good things, yeah…it depends what music you like, but I mean yeah, there’s some good films, but…..yeah, there’s quite a lot but I can’t really think of one, but yeah

     

    AJC:

    Is there a style in particular or a genre of music that you think goes well?

     

    WEV:

    I wouldn’t know [laughing], I’m not into it.

     

    AJC:

    That’s fair enough. Do you have any footage of you skating on the internet?

     

    WEB:

    I wouldn’t know, I never go on the internet cos my brother’s usually on it, but he’s usually on it, but….probably is, but not too much, not too much to be famous like other people but, maybe a little bit

     

    AJC:

    So no direct link that you could give?

     

    WEB:

    No.

     

    AJC:

    That’s brilliant William. Thank you very much.

     

    WEB:

    It’s alright.

     

    AJC:

    Enjoy your skating.

     

    WEB:

    Will do.

     

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

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  • Interviews and Storytelling: James Boylan

    [TRACK 1]

     

    A J CREEDY:

    We’ve got James Boyland here who is a local skateboarder. So what is it you actually like about skateboarding?

     

    JAMES BOYLAN:

    …..the main thing about skateboarding is something to get away from everything else, like…time to relax, like just on the park and stuff, and socialise with your friends.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough. What kind of skating do you like best, because there are different types aren’t there?

     

    JB:

    ….I like it all really, I like the variety of it.

     

    AJC:

    So, across the board then really?

     

    JB:

    Yeah, just all of it.

     

    AJC:

    All of it [laughing]….what skills do you need to be a skater?

     

    JB:

    ….skills to be a skater….you need balance….determination….that’s about it, yeah [laughing]

     

    AJC:

    Balance and determination. That sounds good to me. What skate parks have you been to?

     

    JB:

    I’ve been to Leeds, Hyde Skate Park, London – Mile End, South Bank, Hebden Bridge, Mytholmroyd, not Mytholmroyd, Sowerby Bridge, and one in Spain, don’t know what it’s called.

     

    AJC:

    Blimey, they’re pretty far flung aren’t they? So which one would you say was the best in your opinion?

     

    JB:

    Mile End in London.

     

    AJC:

    And why’s that?

     

    JB:

    It’s big and there’s a lot of variety, and it was empty when I went so I had it to myself.

     

    AJC:

    Even better. Why was that?

     

    JB:

    It was cold [laughing]

     

    AJC:

    It was cold! So a bit of bravery needed to go in there!

     

    JB:

    Yeah, very much.

     

    AJC:

    Braving the cold weather. Okay, so what do you think about Hebden Bridge Skate Park then? Do you like it?

     

    JB:

    It’s quite small, but it’s got everything you need really, just to have a basic skate. It could do with being a bit bigger, but….it’s alright. The people down there as well make the skate park…..yeah.

     

    AJC:

    So I was going to say what’s good about it, but I suppose that answers it

     

    JB:

    Oh, what’s good about it; it’s got a block, a good block.

     

    AJC:

    It’s got a good block.

     

    JB:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Okay. So, here’s a weird one. Do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    JB:

    ….no, I don’t.

     

    AJC:

    Why not?

     

    JB:

    Cos……don’t know, it’s just not very mainstream, like you don’t have loads and loads of people doing it, it’s not like football and it’s like a sport in itself.

     

    AJC:

     

    So do you think it would actually ruin it if it became as big as that and if it was commercialised?

     

    JB:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Yeah, I can see that one. So, is there a good skateboarding crowd, would you say?

     

    JB:

    What do you call a good skateboarding crowd?

     

    AJC:

    Well, your mates – is there a bit of camaraderieship there, is it a close crowd?

     

    JB:

    Yeah, it’s like, there’s a lot of different ranges of ability that people can do down there, so you’ve got people like Mike who is like sponsored and really good, and kids, the smaller kids who come down so you’ve got like a range.

     

    AJC:

    Sounds good. So it’s fairly varied?

     

    JB:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    That’s good. Are there any rules and conventions to skateboarding?

     

    JB:

    Rules?

     

    AJC:

    A wry smile on your face then. [laughing]

     

    JB:

    No, there’s no rules to skateboarding, you make it what it is.

     

    AJC:

    I’m just thinking when you go to a skateboarding park, people seem to know what’s going on, even if there’s loads of people it should be chaos, but it’s somehow not.

     

    JB:

    Yeah, you just wait your turn and…..that’s about it.

     

    AJC:

    So it’s an unwritten rule then, an unwritten convention.

     

    JB:

    Yeah. Everyone knows that if you skate.

     

    AJC:

    It’s very respectful isn’t it really, in that sense?

     

    JB:

    Yeah, in a way.

     

    AJC:

    Okay. What famous skateboarders do you like?…..or teams?

     

    JB:

    Mike Wright would probably be number one.

     

    AJC:

    Hey he’s gonna like you for that. Are you just saying that because he told you?

     

    JB:

    No [laughing]

     

    AJC:

    Why is that then? Why do you like Mike?

     

    JB:

    Cos he’s from Hebden Bridge which is a start, and….don’t know, he’s good, and he’s a sound guy. Also Bill Heath; he’s not famous yet, but…

     

    AJC:

    But he’s getting there.

     

    JB:

    He’s on his way, yeah.

     

    AJC:

    So, apart from skating, what else do you do?

     

    JB:

    Not a lot really. Go to school….listen to a lot of music and play a bit of footie now and then, but skateboarding’s my main hobby.

     

    AJC:

    You don’t have a job then or anything like that?

     

    JB:

    No, I don’t have a job.

     

    AJC:

    So how often do you skate?

     

    JB:

    As often as I can, pretty much every day when it’s dry, and then I try to go to places like Leeds when it’s wet cos they’ve got like indoor skate parks and things.

     

    AJC:

    Right.

     

    JB:

    So yeah, as often as I can.

     

    AJC:

    So how long would a session of skating last?

     

    JB:

    A session….from about twelve till about seven or eight, or……whenever I become tired.

     

    AJC:

    Fair enough. That’s quite a stint in itself actually. That makes me exhausted just thinking about that. So you said you listen to a lot of music. What kind of music do you like, or skate videos; is there a…

     

    JB:

    Skate videos and music….main genres of music I’m into like hip hop, drum and bass, a little bit of funky and grime and skate vids…..oh I don’t watch too much skate vids cos I’m always out there doing it.

     

    AJC:

    You don’t have time – fair enough [laughing]. Okay then. Do you have any footage of you on the internet?

     

    JB:

    Yeah there’s bit. Marcus Wheeler puts them up. He’s got a Youtube channel called Marcus Windrum Wheeler; you look them up on there and other people from Hebden.

     

    AJC:

    So that’s the link then

     

    JB:

    Yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Fantastic. Well, okay, thank you very much. I’ll let you get back to your skating.

     

    JB:

    Cheers.

     

    AJC:

    I’ll see you later. Cheers.

     

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

    Read more

  • Interviews and Storytelling: Ryan Smith

    [TRACK 1]


    A J CREEDY:

    So we’ve got Ryan Smith here who’s a local Hebden Bridge skater; hello.


    RYAN SMITH:

    Alright.


    AJC:

    What do you like about skaketboarding than mate?


    RS:

    ……dunno….fun


    AJC:

    It’s fun, that’s good. Yeah, no that’s fine. What kind of skating do you actually like best?


    RS

    ……grinding.


    AJC:

    Yeah. So, street or…


    RS:

    Streets, yeah. Skate parks as well; it depends.


    AJC:

    Okay. What does it depend on?


    RS:

    Boxes, I like grinding boxes.


    AJC:

    So it really it the grind thing you’re into then? Cool, that’s great. What skills do you think you need to be a good skateboarder?


    RS:

    …….balls.


    AJC:

    [laughing] I tend to agree with you, yeah…yeah, absolutely. I don’t have the balls to do it myself so I completely agree with you. What skate parks have you been to so far then?


    RS:

    …..been to indoor skate parks and Works, one in Burnley….one in Wakefield, been to Hyde Park up in Leeds, I’ve been in a few; Blackpool, went on my mate’s birthdays to Blackpool. That’s fine and all the rest.


    AJC:

    Which one did you like the best?


    RS:

    Blackpool.


    AJC:

    Why’s that?


    RS:

    Cos, faraway and it’s a bit bigger, big vert wall twenty foot up in t’air, didn’t bother going on it though – too big.


    AJC:

    That’s a big vert.


    RS:

    It’s got more of….gaps….little boxes, that’s when I start skating, little boxes and that’s round about it


    AJC:

    And you’ve got a view of the sea.


    RS:

    Oh no it was in the middle of nowhere.


    AJC:

    Was it?


    RS:

    Hard to find.


    AJC:

    Oh they tend to be that way actually. What do you think of Hebden Bridge skate park?


    RS:

    Yeah, it’s just too small. Too many people, all of them into little kids bikers. There’s six or seven bikers down there at once, so……it’s not big enough. AJC:


    AJC:

    So it could do with being bigger?


    RS:

    Yeah.


    AJC:

    What would you say would be a good point about it then?


    RS:

    …..the people.


    AJC:

    That sounds a good thing. Do you think skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?


    RS:

    Yeah, it should be shouldn’t it?


    AJC:

    I think it should yeah. Why do you think it should?


    RS:

    Because they do BMXing and BMX….like they do ramps and BMX in the Olympics don’t they so it should be the same as skateboards.


    AJC:

    And snowboarding. They do snowboarding at Olympic standard, so yeah. Cool. I’d like to see it as an Olympic sport. Are they a good bunch of people then who do skateboarding?


    RS:

    Yeah. All of them are good, yeah.


    AJC:

    Are there any rules or conventions in skateboarding?


    RS:

    No.


    AJC:

    So you just do your own thing?


    RS:

    Yeah.


    AJC:

    That must be why people don’t collide with each other when there’s so many people in the park.


    RS:

    You just get used to it don’t you and you’ve just got to watch out, but like at a flat bank you take it in turns cos you start off at t’top of t’ramp then everyone goes down, does an axle stall then a half pipe, then comes back, you just take it in turns and if it’s a box you take in turns so we don’t run in to each other.


    AJC:

    Fair enough. What famous skateboarders or teams do you like?


    RS:

    ……..I don’t know….got to say Rodney Mullen the famous skater.


    AJC:

    Why’s that?


    RS:

    Cos he doesn’t….he doesn’t do ramps, he does freestyle, like he uses his board stood still, like, not doing kick foots or owt, he lands on it upside down, he does stuff up in the air that other people don’t. Do you know Damo, skateboarder Damo, does a bit of work like he does. Damo does kind of same stuff and that’s why I like it.


    AJC:

    Fair enough.


    RS:

    Old school.


    AJC:

    I can see why. It’s good stuff. What other things do you do besides skateboarding?


    RS:

    Football.


    AJC:

    Keen footballer?


    RS:

    No.


    AJC:

    Not as keen as skateboarding?


    RS:

    I’m not right good at skating either….just takes practice and yeah, I like doing it.


    AJC:

    Fair enough. You don’t have a job then?


    RS:

    Do I have a job? No I’m looking for one though. It’s hard.


    AJC:

    It’s not easy is it mate, it’s not easy. How often do you skate then and how long is a session would you say?


    RS:

    Sometimes….it depends. If it’s on t’holidays I’ll skate from twelve till about…..three, four. I sometimes come down about five and go home about ten. It depends what mood you’re in really.


    AJC:

    What about music then? Is there any particular music that you like, or any skate videos that you could recommend?


    RS:

    …..don’t know. Favourite music’s got to be Kooks….and I like t’Monkeys.


    AJC:

    Arctic Monkeys. They are good. I like them as well, I like Kooks as well. So, is there any footage of you on the internet skating?


    RS:

    No.


    AJC:

    No plans for it?


    RS:

    No.


    AJC:

    That’s fair enough. Okay, thank you very much, and I’ll see you around the skate park


    RS:

    Right. Cheers, see you later.


    [END OF TRACK 1]


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  • Interviews and Storytelling: Joseph Robertshaw

    [TRACK 1]

     

    A J CREEDY:

    We’ve got Joseph Robertshaw here who’s a local Hebden Bridge skater; hello.

     

    JOSEPH ROBERTSHAW:

    Hi.

     

    AJC:

    It’s a beautiful day out here.

     

    JR:

    Yeah, a bit too warm.

     

    AJC:

    It is a bit too warm, so we’ll push on with this and then get a bit of shade. So, why do you like skateboarding?

     

    JR:

    Because it just gives us summat to do and it’s like different to all the other youths, like all the other youths like get penalised for doing something and this is what we do, and it puts us out there to everyone else and it just keeps us fit, and it also is like a hobby.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous. So, what kind of skating do you actually do?

     

    JR:

    I do like all types. It’s just like keeping it all open, and just taking it to the streets as well as the park, so if we could like get the skate park extended and put a street in it as well it would mean that we don’t bother anywhere else.

     

    AJC:

    So right across the board then?

     

    JR:

    Yeah, so it’s all kept in one place.

     

    AJC:

    That’s fantastic. So, what skills do you think you need to be a good skater?

     

    JR:

    Well, balance, that comes with practice, but you can do anything as long as you’ve got a board, it’s like, it doesn’t matter what level you’re at, you’re always welcome to the park. We don’t like tell anyone to stick to certain parts - it’s all about learning – we’ve all started somewhere.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely fantastic. So,what skate parks have you actually visited?

     

    JR:

    Quite a lot, like, well a few, like all in different areas and it’s all about no matter where you go to, everyone’s the same. Everyone still skates and it’s like, as soon as you get there everyone’s got summat in common.

     

    AJC:

    So it’s like a club then really isn’t it?

     

    JR:

    Yeah, it’s like everyone’s friends no matter what type of skater you are. You’ve got your board and it’s just like, all friendly.

     

    AJC:

    So you’ve not got a favourite skate park then?

     

    JR:

    Hebden.

     

    AJC:

    Hebden. That’s brilliant!

     

    JR:

    It’s not just the skaters that are friends, it’s everyone else comes by. It’s like everyone’s a part of it.

     

    AJC:

    And…what would you say was good about Hebden Bridge cos a lot of people do say that Hebden Bridge is their favourite skate park?

     

    JR:

    Hebden’s….it’s just the place, it’s everywhere’s local, and it’s like everyone knows everyone, no matter how far away you live. It’s just like….the shops aren’t far away either, so it’s just like….you can just pop there, like just everything’s just at the centre.

     

    AJC:

    And on a day like this it’s not far to get a cold drink.

     

    JR:

    Yeah, it’s good.

     

    AJC:

    Which we’ll have to indulge in at some stage soon. So, do you think that skateboarding should be an Olympic sport?

     

    JR:

    Yeah definitely. It’s like popular no matter where you go now and it’s like….it’s getting bigger as well, it’s not sticking to the parks, it’s like going everywhere, and like everyone knows what it is now and it should be an Olympic sport, which could be done as ramps or as flats, so it should be an Olympic sport.

     

    AJC:

    Absolutely. I mean I’ve got a question that is…is there a good skateboarding crowd but I think you’ve already said that really haven’t you?

     

    JR:

    Yeah, it’s a massive skateboarding crowd. It’s like everyone knows what it is, everyone knows what you need. You can like just pick out who’s a skater and who’s not, and then sometimes it’s difficult to tell because everyone enjoys it, so yeah.

     

    AJC:

    Brilliant. Are there any rules and conventions would you say?

     

    JR:

    Just keep your head up and aim for a goal, it’s just like…..not to get in anyone’s path and even if you do get in someone’s path, like the person will just apologise, both will apologise even if it’s no-one fault and it’s like so friendly and it’s like….no arguments about it, it’s just like ‘sorry’ and then they’ll do it again.

     

    AJC:

    That’s brilliant, and I’ve seen that actually work quite a few times as well. So, what about famous skateboarders? Have you got any particular kind of skateboarders or skateboard teams for that matter?

     

    JR:

    Well Almost, is the board I skate and anyone on that and it’s like I’ve got loads of idols and they’re the people that keep me going, and I like inspire to be like, and it’s just like people like Haslam and people like that, and Rodney Mullen, it’s just cos they’re unique at what they do, especially Rodney Mullen, he just skates on his own and just gets all of his tricks unique and it’s a new thing to watch, so he’s always quite creative and inspiring to watch his videos.

     

    AJC:

    Fabulous. Do you have a job at the moment?

     

    JR:

    I don’t. Looking for one.

     

    AJC:

    That’s okay. Well you never know, this might catch the….get you out there. How often do you go skating then, and in a session, how long would you skate for?

     

    JR:

    Probably, if I can, all day and the weather’s right. Like now it’s really warm but we’re still doing it, it’s just….cos it’s not raining and just getting out there. Yeah, it’s just whenever it suits. Even if it doesn’t we try and get somewhere. The indoor parks, when it’s raining, they’re always packed and it’s just like still seeing everyone in the mood for it, even though it’s grim outside and miserable.

     

    AJC:

    So, what about your music then? Have you got any particular favourite music or skate videos?

     

    JR:

    Well music, I just listen to any type. When I’m not doing that and it’s raining, it’s all about the music, so it’s like all the things that…whatever you’re in the mood for, there’s music for all that, so it’s like......loads of different, and then the videos, it all depends on what type of skater you are, and it’s if the videos just put you in the mood for….if it’s like just in the morning you’re watching a skate video [incomp] you’ll pick your board up and go and try the moves, it’s like the base of it all is just that people before you doing it and watching them and you wanting to do them moves and then just putting it into practice.

     

    AJC:

    So no particular favourite then?

     

    JR:

    No, there’s too many to choose from. Nowadays as I said it’s growing and it should be like an Olympic sport for that reason alone. It’s growing off itself, enthusiasm.

     

    AJC:

    So, do you have any footage yourself on the internet?

     

    JR:

    Yeah, a few, like local videos and the ones of the trips we go on with the youth workers, and that’s the thing about it, it’s like, it’s also got the adults involved with it to help us out; it’s any age, that’s a good thing as well, it’s not just like kids, it’s adults, and even if you don’t do it, it’s good to watch, so, yeah

     

    AJC:

    Cos you went on the Scotland trip as well didn’t you?

     

    JR:

    Yeah. That was fun, that was really good.

     

    AJC:

    I was privileged enough to go along and I loved it, I learnt a lot about skateboarding and am continuing to learn. So, any link of you, any video of you on the internet?

     

    JR:

    I wouldn’t know off by hand, it’s just Youtube, it’s just growing, so, yeah

     

    AJC:

    Hebden Bridge skaters.

     

    JR:

    Yeah that’s one as well. It’s the Scotland trip. It’s all like that and it’s just….. anything you find to do with skating’s always encouraging, even if it’s from young people showing their first tricks to many people who have done it for years, and it’s all like that, it’s all got this like happy atmosphere to it, and it’s all just memories of people, and then it’s inspiring other people to create their own memories, so yeah

     

    AJC:

    Well thank you very much. I’m sure that this will help to inspire other people.

     

    JR:

    I’m hoping so. Try to get as many people in this sport as possible.

     

    AJC:

    We’ll just go in now before we melt.

     

    JR:

    Thanks.

     

    [END OF TRACK 1]

     

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About Us

Wild Rose Heritage and Arts is a community group which takes it's name from the area in which we are located - the valley ("den") of the wild rose ("Heb") -  Hebden Bridge which is in Calderdale, West Yorkshire.

Get in touch

Pennine Heritage Ltd.
The Birchcliffe Centre
Hebden Bridge
HX7 8DG

Phone: 01422 844450
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